82 Transcript

082 The One about Pure Water for the World


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0:08.2

0:12.8

welcome to Scaling UP! the podcast for
water treater by water treaters where

0:12.8

0:17.4

we’re Scaling UP on knowledge so we
don’t Scaling UP our systems

0:17.4

0:22.9

hello Scaling UP nation Trace Blackmore
here your host for Scaling UP h2o and

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0:30.8

this is another pinks and blues episode
where I am answering questions based on

0:30.8

0:36.9

what the listeners have asked for and I
have themed this episode like I have

0:36.9

0:42.4

done some others I’ve received a lot of
questions based on this particular topic

0:42.4

0:48.8

so we’re just going to talk about this
topic now all these questions stem

0:48.8

0:55.4

around the proper way to calibrate your
equipment and specifically either the pH

0:55.4

1:01.6

or no RP probe or conductivity there’s a
lot of misinformation out there about

1:01.6

1:07.9

the right way to calibrate and when you
need to replace your conductivity meter

1:07.9

1:13.5

or your probes or whatever that may be
and I think a lot of that has to do with

1:13.5

1:21.2

how us the water treater truly take care
of our equipment so when we talk about

1:21.2

1:27.4

conductivity probes or pH probes or ORP
probes typically we’re talking about a

1:27.4

1:33.9

handheld meter that we’re using out in
the field but it could also be on the

1:33.9

1:38.0

controller itself on the device that’s
hanging on the wall that’s delivering

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1:46.4

our program day after day you know these
probes are meant to fail eventually now

1:46.4

1:51.6

conductivity probes are a little bit
more durable than pH and ORP probes and

1:51.6

1:58.5

the PTSA probes that so many people are
using now but you have to understand the

1:58.5

2:04.8

way that many of these probes are built
they have a very specific shelf life and

2:04.8

2:10.6

as soon as they are built they are
starting to die it’s just the nature of

2:10.6

2:15.5

the beast so don’t think if you’ve
purchased one of these probes you’re

2:15.5

2:21.0

done and you never have to purchase it
again folks it’s just how they are

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2:25.3

you will have to replace these probes
now how often you do that

2:25.3

2:34.2

I truly believe is based on how well you
take care of these probes so let’s get

2:34.2

2:41.1

into how to properly calibrate some of
these probes so what I’m doing now I’m

2:41.1

2:47.3

actually looking at my 6p my Rennell
meter and you can also substitute this

2:47.3

2:51.7

for the controller that you might be
having some issues with or another

2:51.7

2:56.9

handheld meter that you have in your
test kit it’s very important that you

2:56.9

3:02.2

know what the battery voltage is now I
say that you don’t really necessarily

3:02.2

3:06.8

have to get a multimeter out and read
the voltage but many of us don’t

3:06.8

3:12.4

understand what’s happening inside that
meter and what happens for example the

3:12.4

3:18.1

6p has a nine volt battery in it but it
doesn’t use nine volts it actually

3:18.1

3:25.3

stages that down to somewhere around six
volts so that battery is fine until it

3:25.3

3:31.8

reaches six volts and then it gives you
the low battery alarm folks if you’re

3:31.8

3:36.6

seeing the low battery alarm it’s very
possible that you do not have enough

3:36.6

3:41.7

voltage going through that meter to make
sure you’re getting an adequate response

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3:49.1

to it nine times out of ten when people
have probes that aren’t holding

3:49.1

3:55.3

consistently their battery hasn’t been
replaced like it should what we do here

3:55.3

4:01.7

Blackmoor enterprises is we replace our
batteries on a regular basis not when

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4:07.6

the meter says that they’re getting that
low battery light and that just ensures

4:07.6

4:13.4

that we’ve got a nice fresh battery in
there so we have plenty of voltage and

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4:18.2

we don’t have to worry about that issue
so I know many of you out there are

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4:23.4

thinking when was the last time I
changed the batteries in my meter if

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4:28.0

that is you
go ahead and spend a few bucks and

4:28.0

4:33.8

change the batteries in your meter
I would also write down when it was that

4:33.8

4:38.5

you change those batteries and if you
have not changed them in a six month

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4:42.6

period I would go ahead and change them
again depending on how much you’re using

4:42.6

4:48.5

that meter that might be too little but
it’s not too much I would say you want

4:48.5

4:53.1

fresh batteries in that meter at least
twice a year so after you change the

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4:59.2

battery now you have to make sure that
the meter is clean and folks I got to

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5:04.0

tell you that most of the problems
outside of not having enough voltage

5:04.0

5:09.9

going through a meter is because many
water treaters will take their sample

5:09.9

5:16.6

and they won’t clean their meter they’re
on site and things dry inside those cups

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5:23.1

where those probes are and those create
havoc with our actual readings so when

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5:27.6

you’re out there and you’re taking your
sample and you’re taking your reading

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5:33.6

make sure that you have a deionizing
bottle with you and rinse that meter out

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5:39.5

really well we like to rinse everything
at least three times and then store it

5:39.5

5:45.1

in the proper solution for example if it
was a pH probe we would store that in

5:45.1

5:51.0

the electrode storage solution which is
not the same as pH 4 buffer because pH 4

5:51.0

5:57.4

buffer has a red dye in it and that will
actually migrate into the pH probe and

5:57.4

6:02.3

cause problems so keeping the meter
clean on a consistent basis is very

6:02.3

6:08.1

important make sure that if you put any
sample into your meter you’re always

6:08.1

6:14.6

washing that out so there’s nothing to
dry and crystallize in any part of your

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6:19.7

meter cups now on a regular basis you
want to make sure and you’re cleaning

6:19.7

6:25.9

your meter physically cleaning your
meter with I like to use simple green

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6:30.4

that’s one of my favorite detergents
it’s actually made here in Lawrenceville

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6:35.1

Georgia where our office is so please
patronize a local company I’m sure if

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6:38.1

you go to Home Depot or anywhere where
you buy your

6:38.1

6:43.3

cleaning supplies you will find simple
green it’s a good degreaser it’s not

6:43.3

6:47.4

going to do a lot for mineral so
hopefully nothing’s dried out on you if

6:47.4

6:54.3

something like that has crystallised
acid such as your alkalinity buffer that

6:54.3

6:59.6

might help soluble eyes anything like
that that’s on there but normally you

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7:05.0

can get away with the simple green if
you are rinsing your meter like I said

7:05.0

7:08.8

on a regular basis and what I like to do
with the simple green is go ahead and

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7:15.1

squirt some down in there and then I use
a q-tip or a clean paper towel and I

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7:22.5

gently remove anything that’s on that pH
probe now in the conductivity probe

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7:27.0

you’ll notice that there’s a little
spoke that comes out halfway into it

7:27.0

7:31.9

that’s how it gets its charge from the
anode to the cathode we actually have a

7:31.9

7:37.3

nice small little brush that allows us
to clean the bottom and all around that

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7:41.6

without bending it be careful you do not
want to bend that little spoke that

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7:46.8

comes out of that probe cup so if you
have a controller at a customer account

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7:52.9

and you need to clean that conductivity
probe my favorite way of doing that is

7:52.9

8:00.0

to isolate the flow on either side take
the probe out and then if you have some

8:00.0

8:05.2

shop air and you can dry the probe you
will be amazed at what you see on that

8:05.2

8:11.0

probe when it’s wet it looks clean but I
assure you when you dry that out it is

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8:17.6

not clean at all and you might then see
oh that’s why I’m not getting a good

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8:23.6

reading so if you want to use shop air
by all means do that but here’s what I

8:23.6

8:29.2

want you to do I want you to keep a
scotch brite pad in your test kit or in

8:29.2

8:34.2

your bag wherever you will want to store
it where you’re not going to use it for

8:34.2

8:40.4

anything else the issue when a lot of us
clean these probes is we use a shop rag

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8:45.5

that we’ve used for the past 12 years
that has everything accumulated on it

8:45.5

8:50.2

within that 12 years folks don’t do that
you’re putting oils and all sorts of

8:50.2

8:55.8

stuff that you’ve cleaned up in
other areas on your probe make sure you

8:55.8

9:02.5

have a designated scotch-brite pad for
this purpose now on conductivity probes

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9:07.2

the toroidal probes are a little
difficult to clean I have found a

9:07.2

9:11.6

toothbrush works pretty well to get in
there for those but the standard

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9:16.9

conductivity probes will either have two
raised probes or they’ll be flush with

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9:23.3

the surface you can use the scotch brite
on either one of these and with the

9:23.3

9:28.7

raised probe what you’re going to do is
put a drop of alkalinity titrant on both

9:28.7

9:33.6

of the electrodes and then you’re going
to use your scotch brite pad and you’re

9:33.6

9:39.4

going to clean on the top and all around
the sides of each of those you want to

9:39.4

9:44.8

make sure you’re using a different spot
on each one of the electrodes because

9:44.8

9:48.8

they’re charged differently and they
could attract each other once you’re

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9:53.7

done doing that go ahead and use your
deionizing bottle and rinse it off

9:53.7

9:58.7

really well and then put a couple of
extra drops on both of the probes so

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10:02.8

that way if you got anything on there
during the cleaning process that will

10:02.8

10:08.3

get that off and again that’s the
alkalinity titrant now if the probes are

10:08.3

10:15.5

flush to the surface when you’re swiping
back and forth you don’t want to put one

10:15.5

10:20.6

probe on to the other because again the
opposites attract so what you want to do

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10:25.2

you want to do an up-and-down fashion
where you’re not over crossing each of

10:25.2

10:29.4

the probes I hope that makes sense I’m
trying to make visual motions but that’s

10:29.4

10:33.1

really hard to come through on the
podcast again once you’re done with that

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10:38.1

go ahead and follow that up with your DI
water and then put a little bit more

10:38.1

10:43.4

acid on each one of the probes and then
rinse that off with DI water that then

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10:50.2

leaves you with a very clean probe now
if you calibrate a probe and you did not

10:50.2

10:54.7

clean it folks you did not calibrate
that probe and when I talk to water

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10:59.9

treaters out in the field they hardly
ever do that so please include this step

10:59.9

11:05.4

with what it is that you are doing now
let’s talk about the differ

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11:10.7

juice that you can use in calibration
well depending on the meter it’s going

11:10.7

11:16.1

to ask you if you want a two point or a
three point calibration some well some

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11:20.2

won’t
a two point calibration can be defined

11:20.2

11:26.2

as this the low point is absolutely no
conductivity at all so basically that

11:26.2

11:30.6

probe is being held in your hand and
it’s dry and it’s just out there in the

11:30.6

11:36.9

air the high conductivity is whatever
fluid that you’re putting it in and I

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11:43.1

urge you to use standard with this
because that way you know for sure and

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11:48.9

folks don’t think you can keep reusing
standard standard is a one-time use only

11:48.9

11:55.0

because whenever you put something in
there you are changing the value of that

11:55.0

12:00.6

standard standard is not that expensive
you are not going to bankrupt anybody by

12:00.6

12:05.9

using fresh standard each and every time
when it comes to standard we have

12:05.9

12:10.0

different types depending on what we’re
testing so we have pH standards we have

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12:16.1

conductivity standards we have ORP
standards we have PTSA standards

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12:21.5

depending on what the normal range is
that you’re testing that’s what you want

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12:26.8

to buy that standard in now here’s a
little aside from that when it comes to

12:26.8

12:34.3

conductivity standard my favorite is the
1413 micro mol standard I will tell you

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12:38.9

when I’ve had customers calibrate
equipment and I’ve given them 1000

12:38.9

12:45.5

conductivity standard anything between
800 and 1,200 is within range of that

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12:54.7

1000 according to them however when you
give somebody a 1413 standard you better

12:54.7

13:01.8

believe that they are going to get that
on the money with 1413 conductivity now

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13:09.9

you might be wondering 1413 that’s so
random why is there a 1413 standard it’s

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13:13.8

actually Oh probably the easiest
standard to make what that is that’s a

13:13.8

13:19.0

molar solution of potassium chloride
into one li

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13:23.8

of water and attention folks I’m getting
ready to do some chemistry but if you

13:23.8

13:30.2

look at the molecular weight of
potassium chloride chloride is 35.5 and

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13:35.4

potassium is 39.1 if you add those
together that’s seventy four point six

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13:42.8

so if you put point seven four six grams
of potassium chloride into one liter of

13:42.8

13:49.4

water and this is deionized water of
course your conductivity is going to be

13:49.4

13:52.8

1413 I don’t know if you’ve ever
wondered where that came from

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13:58.5

but I know when I understand where
things get derived from I understand

13:58.5

14:02.7

them a lot better so there you go that’s
some free information from me to you and

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14:07.6

then of course with pH standards folks
there are pH standards for just about

14:07.6

14:15.1

every pH you want out there but the most
common ones are pH 7 pH 4 and pH 10 but

14:15.1

14:21.4

again before you use any of these you
want to make sure that your batteries

14:21.4

14:27.0

are good your power source is good and
that everything is clean if you did not

14:27.0

14:32.5

do that don’t worry about calibrating
worry about changing your batteries and

14:32.5

14:37.8

cleaning the meter because there’s a
film that will occur and you’re not

14:37.8

14:42.0

getting a true reading like you think
you’re getting the reading of whatever

14:42.0

14:46.1

standard you have going through that
film well I mentioned the two point

14:46.1

14:51.2

calibration the 3 point calibration goes
through exactly those three standards

14:51.2

14:56.0

and typically you’ll see that in pH now
to get back to our 2 point calibration

14:56.0

15:00.1

typically what we’ll do is we’ll
calibrate it in the air and then we’ll

15:00.1

15:06.3

put it in that standard my preference is
that 1413 standard and some meters they

15:06.3

15:10.8

don’t have a low and high they just have
calibrate me to what I’m supposed to be

15:10.8

15:15.5

and then you would do that a little tip
is instead of immediately hitting the

15:15.5

15:20.8

calibration button once you zero that in
on whatever that standard number is let

15:20.8

15:26.0

it sit there for a couple of seconds and
just make sure that it is reading what

15:26.0

15:30.6

you think and then when it’s holding
steady then go ahead and

15:30.6

15:35.4

press that calibration button on pH a
lot of times we’ll have a two-point or a

15:35.4

15:41.4

three-point calibration and what that is
is typically we’re using seven standard

15:41.4

15:45.7

and then a four or a ten standard that’s
with the two-point with a three-point

15:45.7

15:52.0

we’re using all again after you have a
nice clean probe your battery is changed

15:52.0

15:56.8

out you’re gonna go ahead and most
meters start with seven again you don’t

15:56.8

16:01.5

want to keep reusing standard this is
brand new standard every time you use it

16:01.5

16:06.2

and you’re gonna put that seven in there
and you’re gonna calibrate the meter to

16:06.2

16:11.3

seven then a lot of meters will tell you
to put four in or they’ll tell you to

16:11.3

16:16.5

put 10 in or some will just know that if
you’re putting four or ten in so I like

16:16.5

16:23.4

to test the last solution on what I am
normally going to test so in cooling

16:23.4

16:28.2

tower water it’s normally in the eights
so I’ll normally end with ten I don’t

16:28.2

16:31.7

know if that’s right or wrong that’s
just how I do it so I’ll put the seven

16:31.7

16:35.8

in I’ll make sure that that’s holding
for a couple of seconds I’ll then hit

16:35.8

16:41.2

calibrate I will then hit the four
standard pour that in there and by the

16:41.2

16:47.5

way you want to make sure that you rinse
the old standard out well if I just pour

16:47.5

16:52.6

the seven out and then I fill my cup up
with four I do not have four in that cup

16:52.6

16:58.6

I have four with seven residual left
over so I actually triple rinse my cup

16:58.6

17:03.9

with that four standard then on the
fourth fill I know I’m getting a good

17:03.9

17:10.1

for pH reading I let that stabilize I
then hit the button and then I do the

17:10.1

17:15.4

same thing triple rinsing with the ten
and then on the fourth fill I will then

17:15.4

17:20.2

get my pH reading for 10 and I’ll
calibrate it and the meter should have a

17:20.2

17:26.9

nice stable calibration at that point
now let’s talk about what happens when

17:26.9

17:30.5

you calibrate a meter or a controller
and by the way you’re going to the exact

17:30.5

17:35.2

same thing with a controller that I just
mentioned for the handheld meter when

17:35.2

17:41.7

you calibrate a probe and say no probe
the answer that you’re giving me is not

17:41.7

17:48.2

correct it really should be
you are adding some sort of number to

17:48.2

17:53.5

the algorithm that that probe is reading
every time you calibrate you’re adding a

17:53.5

18:00.1

new number to that so on top of on top
of on top of folks if you have not reset

18:00.1

18:04.9

that value and a lot of times you have
to do that by factory reinitializing the

18:04.9

18:10.8

controller or the meter you might not be
getting an accurate reading because

18:10.8

18:15.2

there’s so many values that are in there
that you’ve previously calibrated on

18:15.2

18:20.5

you’re not getting the reading that you
think and your meter is just off because

18:20.5

18:25.3

there’s so many equations in there now
something that’s very important that if

18:25.3

18:30.2

you ever change your probe out whether
it’s a controller whether it’s a

18:30.2

18:36.7

handheld meter you have to set that back
to zero because those old numbers were

18:36.7

18:42.7

based on your old probe and again even
if it’s the same probe and you haven’t

18:42.7

18:47.6

done that in a while it’s not a bad idea
to go ahead and start from scratch

18:47.6

18:54.0

because now you know that that
calibration is based on the base reading

18:54.0

18:59.7

of that probe if you have a controller
and you have to factory reinitialize

18:59.7

19:03.7

that and I have seen more and more
controllers that will allow you to reset

19:03.7

19:07.7

just the calibration on a particular
probe but there are still some

19:07.7

19:12.6

controllers out there that won’t allow
you to do that so what you have to do is

19:12.6

19:19.5

go in and factory reset that a lot of
the controllers will have a USB drive

19:19.5

19:25.3

port on there where you can go ahead and
capture your program so that way you

19:25.3

19:29.5

don’t have to reprogram everything if
you don’t have that we’ll go ahead

19:29.5

19:34.2

before you factory reinitialize it take
a legal pad whatever you’re using to

19:34.2

19:39.9

take notes and make notes of what all of
your items are in the entire controller

19:39.9

19:46.2

programming so you can program that back
in I know that’s a lot of work but you

19:46.2

19:51.0

really don’t know what that probe is
reading until you do that folks it’s

19:51.0

19:54.9

really important whenever you’re
handling the probe these things are made

19:54.9

20:00.4

out of glass or a very thin
piece of metal you have to make sure

20:00.4

20:05.5

that you don’t damage those in cleaning
I’ve seen many people shove a paper

20:05.5

20:11.2

towel down a reservoir or Cup where the
probe is and they’ve been things and

20:11.2

20:15.6

then things never work right so please
be careful when you’re doing this

20:15.6

20:22.7

process and like I said before if you
keep your equipment clean you will get

20:22.7

20:27.8

so much better results from that
equipment and folks I gotta let you know

20:27.8

20:32.6

I’ve said this on other shows but you
are only as good as the equipment that

20:32.6

20:38.8

you are using and your equipment is only
as good as the person that is using that

20:38.8

20:44.5

piece of equipment so if you have not
gotten out the OEM the original

20:44.5

20:50.7

equipment manual for your particular
piece of equipment please go online and

20:50.7

20:55.2

download that and see what they say
about calibrating see what they say

20:55.2

21:00.5

about troubleshooting and that’s gonna
get you more in the know about what’s

21:00.5

21:04.9

going on each and every time you
calibrate your equipment another

21:04.9

21:11.2

question I get on a fairly common basis
is can you bring a failing probe back to

21:11.2

21:15.4

life and a lot of people say you can
rehydrate those so a lot of the probes

21:15.4

21:18.8

they’ll have that potassium chloride in
it that we talked about so if you have a

21:18.8

21:24.6

supersaturated solution a potassium
chloride and you put that probe in there

21:24.6

21:29.2

well that glass is a semipermeable
membrane and that’s actually how that

21:29.2

21:32.9

works so since you have a higher
concentration on the outside of

21:32.9

21:36.4

potassium chloride sometimes it will
migrate through to where there’s a lower

21:36.4

21:41.0

concentration and you might be able to
get a little bit more life out of that

21:41.0

21:46.7

probe but folks I’m here to tell you
I’ve never had that work more than a

21:46.7

21:50.7

couple of weeks I got really excited hey
I saved a hundred-and-something bucks

21:50.7

21:55.2

for this new probe I was able to
rehydrate it back in my lab but when I

21:55.2

22:00.8

went back out there in the field it just
did not hold calibration so when you buy

22:00.8

22:08.3

any type of probe make sure you budget
for replacing that in about a year’s

22:08.3

22:12.5

plus time because again as
said at the top of the show when these

22:12.5

22:18.7

things are made they already start dying
so I hope this gets some of the

22:18.7

22:24.1

questions answered that I’ve received
about calibration about pH probes and

22:24.1

22:29.9

conductivity probes we didn’t talk a lot
about PTSA probes or ORP probes but just

22:29.9

22:34.5

know that they have standards for that
the exact same thing that I was saying

22:34.5

22:39.2

earlier applies for those make sure that
they are clean make sure your power

22:39.2

22:44.0

source is good you might have to reset
any former calibrations that you have

22:44.0

22:49.0

done then you’re going to put those into
a standard and folks they make all sorts

22:49.0

22:55.4

of different types of standards PTSA is
one that we make here in the lab we just

22:55.4

22:59.9

take the PTSA that we’re blending our
products with and then we calibrate to a

22:59.9

23:05.3

hundred parts per billion and we go
ahead and make sure that that lens is

23:05.3

23:11.3

nice and clean the same way I told you
that we cleaned the pH probes is the

23:11.3

23:15.2

same way that we clean that little lens
that sends the ultraviolet light through

23:15.2

23:20.2

and the other side that reads it and
we’ve had really good success because I

23:20.2

23:26.5

think we keep the battery nice and fresh
and we rinse with deionized water after

23:26.5

23:32.7

every single test and then of course we
clean it on a regular basis folks that’s

23:32.7

23:37.3

something that you might want to
consider is to keep a log on how often

23:37.3

23:44.3

you clean it so every single week what
my team does is they calibrate their

23:44.3

23:49.7

meters and they log those and they make
sure that they log that we are cleaning

23:49.7

23:53.7

it and that’s not because I don’t trust
that they’re not doing that but it’s

23:53.7

23:59.8

just a thing that allows us to keep
doing it on a consistent basis and then

23:59.8

24:05.6

we can see if a probe is actually
getting out of calibration so it’s not

24:05.6

24:10.0

quite time to change it but we can see
we need to get another probe in here

24:10.0

24:15.1

because this one’s going to need to be
changed soon and folks that being said

24:15.1

24:22.6

you don’t want to stock pH probes or ORP
probes things that have that glass cell

24:22.6

24:26.1

because again they’re going
to die on the shelf so you want to order

24:26.1

24:32.4

those when you need those and then of
course you might not have time to go and

24:32.4

24:35.7

order those so maybe you want to keep
one on the shelf but I don’t like to do

24:35.7

24:39.8

that I like to order them as fresh as
possible because they have a very

24:39.8

24:45.0

limited shelf life so folks something
you might want to consider is that log

24:45.0

24:51.2

that just makes sure that you’re doing
something on a regular basis and you can

24:51.2

24:55.1

do that with all of your tests something
that I really like to do here at

24:55.1

24:59.7

Blackmore Enterprises is I will make a
known concentration of something up in

24:59.7

25:05.9

my lab and then I’ll have everybody out
on our team come in and they will run

25:05.9

25:11.7

those tests mathematically I know what
they should get but now we’re gonna see

25:11.7

25:16.7

what they get in their test kit and if
it’s off normally it’s not a procedural

25:16.7

25:20.8

issue but sometimes it is and then we
can educate based on that but normally

25:20.8

25:26.1

it’s because maybe one of the dropper
tips is clogged up maybe there is a

25:26.1

25:31.0

malfunction with their digital Thai
trader because we have a procedure like

25:31.0

25:38.2

that we are able to isolate issues
before they become an issue

25:38.2

25:45.5

so again are you treating your equipment
the way that you should be treating it

25:45.5

25:51.2

because US water treatment folk are only
as good as the equipment that allows us

25:51.2

25:57.4

to get a small glimpse inside the water
and if we are not treating that

25:57.4

26:02.3

equipment properly it’s not going to
give us good results meaning that we are

26:02.3

26:08.6

not going to do what we should do in
adjusting that program folks this entire

26:08.6

26:15.3

episode came from questions from the
Scaling UP nation around calibration of

26:15.3

26:22.7

pH ORP and conductivity so I hope this
was helpful I hope you are now thinking

26:22.7

26:26.3

when was the last time I changed the
batteries you know I really do need to

26:26.3

26:34.0

clean my meter on a more regular basis
and maybe I do need to refer to the

26:34.0

26:37.6

owner’s manual to make sure that I’m
doing all

26:37.6

26:42.5

of that properly folks you can find all
of that online about your meter and I

26:42.5

26:47.4

want to urge you to keep those questions
coming it’s because of those questions

26:47.4

26:51.9

that I was able to do this show so thank
you for everybody out there in the

26:51.9

26:57.2

Scaling UP nation that wrote in and
asked me about that and I hope that this

26:57.2

27:03.0

episode has helped make your tests a
little bit more accurate have a great

27:03.0

27:08.0

week folks

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