60 Transcript

060 The One About Public Speaking


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welcome to Scaling UP! H2O the podcast
for water treaters by water treaters

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where we’re Scaling UP! on knowledge so
we don’t Scaling UP! our systems hi folks

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Trace Blackmore here the host of Scaling UP! H2O and Scaling UP! Nation how do you

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can start trying audible for free so on
today’s show we’re gonna talk about

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public speaking oh my gosh that is
everybody’s biggest fear to get in front

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of a bunch of other people and start
speaking where all these people are

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listening to me and there was a time
where I did not like speaking in front

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of people and there were certain things
that I did to make sure that I was

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prepared so I would make myself less
nervous now I will tell you the more I

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have done it it does not make me as
nervous but the less I am prepared the

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more nervous I am so that’s why I try to
over prepare every time I get in front

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of an audience and a lot of you saw me
at the AWT convention we just had a

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couple of weeks ago and you saw that I
spoke at numerous events at the AWT

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convention and my hope is that you
didn’t think that I was nervous at all

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I’m gonna let you know in a secret
there’s always a little bit of nerves

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down inside however I try not to let
that show and that totally goes away

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when I see that people are involved in
what I’m talking about

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and folks that’s what I always get
nervous about that people aren’t gonna

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care about what I am talking about so if
I am hitting on the right topic and I

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did my research correctly I know that I
have captured the attention of the

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audience and they are coming along the
journey with me and of course I do the

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same thing with aw T’s Technical
Training and there’s no secret there

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people that are way better at public
speaking than I am gosh I hope so but

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I’m still glad you listened to this
podcast however I want you to know that

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I seek professional advice to get me to
speak better one of those people is a

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good friend of mine his name is Dez
Thornton and what he does he is a public

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speaking coach and he will listen to how
you present to what you present look at

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how you put everything together and he
makes it better now he doesn’t know a

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thing about water treatment but he knows
how to produce a good presentation about

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water treatment and he has been
tremendous in helping me get my messages

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across to audiences that I present to
please enjoy my interview with Dez

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Thornton my lab partner today is Dez
Thornton Dez how you doing today buddy

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I’m doing excellent choice thank you for
having me absolutely we want to thank

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you for coming on Scaling UP! because I
don’t care who you are out there in the

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5:51.1

Scaling UP! Nation you have to talk to
people during your day to day there’s

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just no getting around it and Dez is the
expert on how to do this how is that for

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a set up sounds great I’m pleased to
have the opportunity to be here my

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career has taken me to several different
industries but never the water treatment

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industry so thank you for introducing me
to this wonderful industry and hello to

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the scale up nation yes absolutely your
entire career has been a wind-up for

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this moment so so no pressure at all
does I think I’m ready

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I know you are so I don’t leave anything
out can you please let the Scaling UP!

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Nation know who Dez Thornton is sure
well I am a speech coach as well as a

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speech writer and like most people I
stumbled into my purpose maybe nine

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years or so ago and
since that time I’ve continually hone my

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skills and refine my processes and today
I would consider myself a successful

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speechwriter and coach and my passion is
really helping executives and

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entrepreneurs say the right words and
the right way when it matters most does

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you know something that you and I speak
about regularly is I try to be a better

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communicator on the show and I am trying
to be a better communicator when I’m

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trying to teach the topic of water
treatment and and the items that you

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have revealed to me have helped me so
much not only in those endeavors but my

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day-to-day interactions with people so I
can’t wait to start revealing some of

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these items to the Scaling UP! Nation
because I know firsthand how much they

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can help but I want to start out with
this because I asked the great Google

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and of course nobody can argue with the
great Google and I said Google what are

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some of the biggest fears that we have
and do you know what one of the biggest

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ones that came up was I could probably
guess that one of the fears this public

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speaking right that was exactly what
came up now I have a question about that

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because everybody speaks and everybody
knows how to do it most of us speak the

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same language or some proximity to it so
now we’re doing something we know how to

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do we’re doing something that we we want
to engage with that person why do we get

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so stressed out when we hear the words
public speaking or the thought of

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speaking in front of people yeah that’s
a great question I think it’s actually

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two answers to that whole fear of public
speaking question on the one hand I’ve

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worked with many people over the years
and I think that I would say probably

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100 percent of them experience some
degree of fear and I think that fear is

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rooted in the fact that they are going
to be judged so when they’re standing in

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front of an audience or sitting across
the table from an audience in a

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one-to-one situation
there’s always that fear that people are

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going to judge you and so I think that’s
the root of the fear is this whole

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judgment thing that we all grapple with
but to answer your question a little

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more specifically I think the root cause
is not really a fear of public speaking

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but it’s more so a fear of public
thinking now when you think about that

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when you’re speaking in front of a group
were even in a one-to-one situation if

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you’re talking to a client or a prospect
basically every thought that’s coming to

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your mind is very quickly coming out of
your mouth and so it can be challenging

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to balance the weight of your thoughts
and I think the real culprit is a fear

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of public thinking and not a fear of
public speaking well that’s a great

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point and I’m sure we’re going to get to
that and you’ve got some tips on how we

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can think better when we’re in front of
people absolutely absolutely

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does one of the things that you like to
say is there’s a great public speaking

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myth what is that yes so the great
public speaking myth and many people are

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guilty of this myself including from
time to time is that just because you’re

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standing in front of an audience or
sitting in front of an audience that

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that audience is listening to what
you’re saying now you would think that

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if someone is speaking to you that the
other party is listening but that’s not

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always the case
and so I found in my experience with

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public speaking that you have to do a
little bit of work in order to get

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people to listen to you particularly
today when there are so many

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distractions like the phone and social
media and just all the challenges and

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the millions of thoughts that go through
our heads and so I think the first thing

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that you have to do when it comes to any
type of speaking is be strategic about

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grabbing your audience’s attention and
that requires a little bit of skill so

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the great public speaking myth is just
because you’re speaking people are

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listening and of course that’s not
always true of course when people listen

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to this show
always true course tres anytime your

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voice is coming through the airwaves we
all listening that’s right that’s right

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I I’m not sure if that’s true or not but
but there you go I want to make sure

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that we focus to everybody out there in
the Scaling UP! Nation because I’m sure

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we still have a couple of people out
there and they’re saying you know what

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this sounds great you know eventually
I’m gonna get an award for my company

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and I’m gonna have to get up there on
stage or I might have to give some big

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presentation but until then I really
don’t see how this applies to me so I

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was hoping we could take a second and
talk about you know your public speaking

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when you’re giving a presentation or
where you’re giving a proposal when

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you’re on a cold call when you’re
meeting somebody when you’re trying to

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explain what it is that you did during a
particular service call and then what

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they need to do to get something up to
the next level so does how do you frame

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all of that in so it’s not just about
I’m up on stage and I’m talking to a big

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group of people but I have a
responsibility to make sure that I’m

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getting my message across in every
encounter yeah absolutely I think the

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easiest way to frame it is quite simply
it’s conversations and presentations and

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so anytime that you speak whether you’re
speaking to your spouse or partner

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you’re speaking to your children or if
you’re in business and you’re speaking

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to a client or you’re speaking to a
prospect it can be a one-on-one

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situation or you could be presenting in
the traditional way where you’re

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speaking to a large group and all of
those instances the communicator which

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is usually you have some type of motive
or some type of goal that you want to

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accomplish you know even if it’s with
your children and I believe an

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experience has shown me that you need to
be strategic about that communication

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and you really need to be clear about it
so when I talk in terms of presentation

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skills or public speaking I use the
phrase it could be whether you’re

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speaking to one or you’re speaking to a
ton it doesn’t matter

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you know these practices are the same
and I would suggest that they probably

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apply more to one-to-one and smaller
group situations than they

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due to large audiences because those are
the encounters that we have more often

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throughout our day-to-day loss does I’ve
heard you speak that there are three

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different levels of this problem with
public speaking that we have to deal

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with do you mind speaking a little on
that sure so one of the main objectives

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when you’re communicating is clarity to
make sure that what you’re actually

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saying the person on the other end the
recipient is actually hearing so that

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way of course if you’re on the same page
then you can move forward as far as the

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objectives are concerned and so the best
way to do that is just to look at the

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problem from three different levels
now the first level of the problem is

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the known spoken problem so you can
think about this in your business

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environment for example there’s certain
things that go on in the work

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environment that everybody knows and
everybody talks about as a problem and

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so those are the things that sort of lie
on the surface the second level is the

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14:42.1

known unspoken problem and we’ve all
experienced this and our family lives or

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in our business lives where we all
clearly know that there’s a problem

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there’s challenge facing us but nobody’s
talking about it and I think that might

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be why that famous phrase the elephant
in the room was invented because

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everyone knows that something is going
on here but no one is talking about it

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and then the last and what I believe is
the most important level of the problem

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is the unknown unspoken problem so what
is that thing what is that challenge

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that we’re facing as an organization as
a team as a business that we might not

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be aware of and because we’re not aware
of it we’re not able to speak about it

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now with this particular level of the
problem when you think about this from a

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15:29.9

business standpoint if you’re in with a
client let’s say for example or a

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15:35.2

prospect and you can say to that client
or prospect you know hey I’ve evaluated

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your situation and based on the
conversations we’ve had you know this is

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15:43.4

something that I see going on
based on my experience or based

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15:47.7

my expertise that you may not be
thinking about yet and this is the

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15:54.7

impact that it could have for you in the
future I always try to get my clients to

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speak from this perspective because it
is the fastest way for you to be looked

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16:04.0

at as a trusted adviser when you can
tell people that something is around the

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16:09.3

corner that could potentially impact
them and they have no idea that it’s on

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16:14.1

the horizon I think when they look back
they were able to quickly assess that

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16:18.8

you know this man a woman certainly has
expertise and it’s helpful for them and

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16:24.0

their company going forward is there
anything that you’ve seen people do that

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16:30.9

lubricates that situation makes it a
little bit easier so okay I’m basically

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16:35.1

what we’re talking about here is is
trust so if someone trusts me they’re

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going to explore the unknown unspoken
sooner so what can we do with that yeah

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absolutely
I love the term that you use lubricate

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that situation I think going through the
first two steps of the problem with them

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16:53.5

so addressing that known spoken problem
I always believe that when you

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16:57.3

communicate you want to get agreement
and so if you and the other party can

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17:02.0

agree that you know yes this thing is
going on in our organization or at

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17:07.5

within a particular system we’re having
this problem or malfunction then that

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first level of agreement is going to be
the first step toward that trust that’s

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17:16.7

you’re ultimately seeking and then the
second level the known unspoken problem

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then you have to find a way to sort of
carefully navigate that as well to now

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have them talk about something that
maybe is not discussed publicly I think

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17:30.8

when you can go through those first two
levels that sort of lubricates things so

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17:36.1

that you can get to the level of the
unknown unspoken and ultimately achieve

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17:41.8

that title or that position as a trusted
adviser to whomever your client may be

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if you get to the point where you’ve
done all of that and you just can’t

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agree on a mutual outcome do you leave
that in the room or is it okay to

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17:56.9

disagree agreeably I think it’s okay to
disagree depending on

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18:01.6

you know what the ultimate goal is I
would revisit that issue and we probably

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18:06.3

have to be you know a little more
specific but generally you know you want

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18:11.0

to answer as many questions as possible
if you’re let’s say for example working

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18:14.9

with a client and that client has an
issue I think you always have to be

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18:20.8

cognizant of just the timeframe a lot of
times if people are you know unfamiliar

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18:24.7

you know with this problem that you’re
talking about and they’ve been immersed

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18:29.0

in their business for you know however
many years they’re probably going to

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18:33.4

think that you know this is something
that I will thought of before and they

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18:37.2

may not be quick to trust you know what
you’re saying so I think you have to

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18:40.8

just be strategic about the way if
you’re confident that this could be an

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18:45.1

issue for them going forward one of the
things that you can do is just use a

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18:49.8

comparison to other clients that you’ve
worked with before or other things that

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18:54.6

you’ve seen in your industry so sort of
established so a pattern or trend you

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18:58.8

know here but I would say stay with it
if it’s something that you believe can

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19:02.5

ultimately help your client be
respectful of your time and I understand

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19:06.9

that you know it takes some pious longer
than others to come to that point of

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19:11.9

understanding or even admit it but
certainly I wouldn’t let it go if you

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19:16.1

think it’s something that could be
pivotal or beneficial to your client I’m

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19:19.2

sure we have listeners out there and
they say what just happened we started

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19:22.1

talking about public speaking now it
sounds like we’re talking about sales

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19:28.0

but they’re really the same thing aren’t
they absolutely many of my clients are

19:28.0

19:32.4

individuals who are in sales and I
believe that as I said earlier that

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19:36.1

anytime that you’re communicating
essentially you’re selling whether

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19:40.7

you’re trying to sell an idea whether
you’re trying to sell people on you know

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19:46.1

information that they need to do their
jobs better or to understand four

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19:50.8

systems or processes to work better I
believe that we’re always selling and

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19:55.4

that’s why it’s critically important
that should be clear so that people can

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20:00.7

understand your opponent’s view as you
mentioned earlier that most of us have

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20:05.3

the fear of thinking in front of people
more than really speaking in front of

20:05.3

20:10.1

people but what about what the audience
is thinking yeah so choice this is a

20:10.1

20:12.5

Hugh
channel worms that we’re opening up and

20:12.5

20:18.3

a place where I actually love to spend
time and to think is about the audience

20:18.3

20:23.7

so it’s always important to understand
the people that you’re speaking to and

20:23.7

20:27.8

the more you understand the people that
you’re speaking to whether it be a

20:27.8

20:31.9

client prospect or a colleague within
your own company

20:31.9

20:35.3

the more that you understand their
position and where they come from then

20:35.3

20:39.3

it makes it a lot easier to get your
point across to also when they gain

20:39.3

20:43.7

their trust and be able to influence
them and the way that you’re seeking to

20:43.7

20:50.2

so the first thing that I believe is you
as the presenter or as the communicator

20:50.2

20:56.0

have to be keenly aware of what it is
you want to accomplish so I always

20:56.0

21:01.0

suggest that when you’re going to be
communicating ask yourself some simple

21:01.0

21:06.2

questions number one is what do I want
this audience to know so what is the one

21:06.2

21:11.6

thing that it’s important for this
audience to know secondly is how do I

21:11.6

21:17.6

want this audience or my listener to
feel when this is over and then thirdly

21:17.6

21:24.6

is what do I want them to do so you as
the presenter have to get that part of

21:24.6

21:29.4

it clear in your mind before you
approach the situation from there the

21:29.4

21:33.6

next thing is important is to look at
your audience and to assess you know

21:33.6

21:37.1

what is your audience currently belief
about what you’re talking about

21:37.1

21:41.1

and once you know what your audience
believes and how they’re currently

21:41.1

21:46.4

behaving based on that belief then you
have to again determine what do I want

21:46.4

21:51.0

them to believe and how do I want them
to behave and once you can do that you

21:51.0

21:54.9

now have this natural gap between what
they’re currently doing and what you

21:54.9

21:59.5

want them to do and then once you have
that awareness of what you want them to

21:59.5

22:04.9

know how you want them to feel what you
want them to believe then ultimately the

22:04.9

22:09.5

speech sort of order your content
emerges in the midst of that particular

22:09.5

22:15.5

gas so awareness is critically important
as a first step what does let me ask you

22:15.5

22:22.0

so let’s put ourselves in a situation
where we are presenting a proposal to a

22:22.0

22:25.3

prospective
and we’ve had a good rapport with them

22:25.3

22:30.1

they’ve told us what the issues are
we’ve got more information about what

22:30.1

22:33.6

the issues are so we could actually come
to solutions and maybe we’ve even

22:33.6

22:38.5

pointed out some more problems that they
didn’t even realize they have now we’re

22:38.5

22:42.7

sitting in front of them we have our
nice pretty binder in front of us and

22:42.7

22:47.7

we’re presenting to them and we want to
make sure that we get the most impactful

22:47.7

22:53.1

message across to them what should we do
yeah well trace it sounds like you’ve

22:53.1

22:57.8

done the heavy lifting up front which I
recommend and actually is number two in

22:57.8

23:01.7

the process of understanding the
audience’s psychology and that’s

23:01.7

23:06.4

relatability so what you just described
is a great way for you to seek to

23:06.4

23:11.5

understand you know what are the needs
of the audience so what problems are

23:11.5

23:14.9

they really facing going back to the
problem model that we talked about

23:14.9

23:19.3

earlier what problems are they really
facing and once you can understand the

23:19.3

23:24.3

audiences problem and you can articulate
it to them then it’s always interesting

23:24.3

23:28.8

for me to see this is the place where
that willful engagement starts to happen

23:28.8

23:32.7

or it opens the door and people lean in
a little bit more because they think

23:32.7

23:37.4

that you understand or clearly
understand they’re a problem once you

23:37.4

23:41.2

kind of have that relatability then the
first step is positioning so how do you

23:41.2

23:44.7

position yourself and exactly what
you’re doing here in the proposal phase

23:44.7

23:48.4

is how do you position yourself so that
you can get the buy-in of the

23:48.4

23:53.3

individuals that you’re talking to as my
belief that once you go to present a

23:53.3

23:57.4

proposal to our client you could pretty
much get most of the agreement up front

23:57.4

24:02.8

before you even present the proposal so
I suggest to my clients that they should

24:02.8

24:08.4

try to be at the 80 percent mark before
they go in to submit a proposal or if

24:08.4

24:11.9

they’re going to be doing a presentation
with a proposal because many of those

24:11.9

24:16.0

things can be worked out up front and
you’re talking about of course soft

24:16.0

24:20.8

closing through the entire process
exactly yeah so soft closing through the

24:20.8

24:25.1

entire process to where you’re getting
agreement along the way the first half

24:25.1

24:28.8

of the proposal in my opinion is just to
make sure that we’re in the same page as

24:28.8

24:33.3

far as objectives are concerned and then
how we’re going to measure success and

24:33.3

24:36.1

then of course lastly is just getting
that on

24:36.1

24:40.8

as approval for whatever the type of
change it is that you’re looking for so

24:40.8

24:45.5

if you’re trying to persuade them you’re
gaining acceptance or permission or

24:45.5

24:50.1

you’re trying to invoke change you know
whatever your in game maybe of course is

24:50.1

24:54.3

the final phase and I believe where you
have impact with your audience

24:54.3

24:59.2

well Dez let’s change it up a little bit
now my audience is I’m in front of an

24:59.2

25:03.6

association of Water Technologies
technical training seminar and I’ve got

25:03.6

25:07.5

a couple of hundred people in front of
me and I’m supposed to be delivering

25:07.5

25:12.1

information on how they can become
better water treaters how do we go

25:12.1

25:16.2

through that process in that format so
let’s take the same situation and

25:16.2

25:21.4

imagine as you said Trace that you’re
presenting to a group of 200 people the

25:21.4

25:26.6

same basic principles are going to apply
so when we go to step number one and

25:26.6

25:31.1

talking about the awareness you still
want to make sure that you know what you

25:31.1

25:35.2

want to communicate to the audience you
want to be clear on how you want the

25:35.2

25:39.1

audience to feel when you’re done and
you also want to be clear in terms of

25:39.1

25:44.7

what you want the audience to do now in
this situation is probably going to be

25:44.7

25:49.2

much easier for you to understand
audiences behavior particularly if

25:49.2

25:53.9

you’re speaking to folks within your
industry so let’s say for example you

25:53.9

25:58.7

need to understand you know what do
people currently believe about water

25:58.7

26:02.2

treatment or where do they currently
believe about the latest technology and

26:02.2

26:06.5

water treatment and how are they
behaving as a result of that so that’s

26:06.5

26:10.2

the starting point and then once you’re
clear on those things then you look to

26:10.2

26:14.8

say well what do I want these people to
believe again that’s the message that

26:14.8

26:18.9

you’re delivering from the platform and
how do I want them to behave what do I

26:18.9

26:23.4

don’t want them to do as a result of
this belief so you really have an

26:23.4

26:27.6

opportunity to dial in number one
because you’re within the industry and

26:27.6

26:32.2

another thing that you can do here I
always recommend that you interview your

26:32.2

26:36.8

audience participants before the
presentation to find out you know what

26:36.8

26:41.4

is important or what issues they think
are critical now the second step of

26:41.4

26:46.1

course is relatability so being that you
would be part of the industry or even if

26:46.1

26:49.6

you’re outside the industry if you do a
pre-interview or in gay

26:49.6

26:53.2

some of your colleagues to find out
what’s important to them then you’ll

26:53.2

26:58.2

understand you’ll hear in that process
what their needs are and what these

26:58.2

27:03.7

might make them lean in and willfully
engage in your point of view once you’re

27:03.7

27:08.3

armed with that information then you
begin positioning your presentation or

27:08.3

27:12.6

your proposal as we were talking about
previously and then lastly you just

27:12.6

27:17.7

strategically build impact so how do I
get the persuasion in order to invoke

27:17.7

27:23.0

change gain acceptance get permission or
even get people to buy into this new

27:23.0

27:28.0

water treatment technology that you’re
talking about so whether as you can see

27:28.0

27:30.9

here whether you’re talking about a
proposal or whether you’re talking about

27:30.9

27:35.0

a presentation or fundable group of
people the audience is pretty much going

27:35.0

27:38.9

to be the same and the process that you
go through is going to be the same to

27:38.9

27:42.0

understand them
and all of those things set you up to be

27:42.0

27:46.9

in a better position to get their trust
and ultimately influence them acting it

27:46.9

27:51.4

does I just can’t help but bring this up
we started this conversation with it’s

27:51.4

27:56.3

not really a fear of public speaking
it’s a fear of public thinking but

27:56.3

28:01.3

everything that you’ve described creates
so much upfront legwork whether we’re

28:01.3

28:05.7

learning the situation at the new
customers site and and and all of the

28:05.7

28:10.1

things that they’ve got to deal with or
we’re pre-interview in the audience and

28:10.1

28:14.7

we’re finding out exactly what their
beliefs are and where we need to go and

28:14.7

28:20.4

where we want them to get to all of that
legwork has to calm us down and make us

28:20.4

28:25.9

feel better during whatever this phase
is that we’re doing Trice absolutely

28:25.9

28:31.3

that’s the magic right there I believe
that if you were to put presentation no

28:31.3

28:37.2

matter if it’s a small conversation a
one-on-one or someone on a large stage

28:37.2

28:43.5

80% of that speech or a presentation
happens before you step on stage but

28:43.5

28:49.8

before you sit down in front of the
client 80% is done beforehand 10% is

28:49.8

28:54.1

actually the live presentation whether
you’re on stage or sitting across from

28:54.1

28:59.2

someone and then the last 10% is sort of
a review process where you look back and

28:59.2

29:02.9

say well you know I could have did this
better I should

29:02.9

29:07.7

this differently to be more effective
but you you sort of discovered the magic

29:07.7

29:13.1

trace if you do the thinking beforehand
and you have those things clear and laid

29:13.1

29:17.7

out no matter what the situation it
definitely alleviates some of the

29:17.7

29:23.1

anxiety and fear that most people fear
when they’re actually speaking and it

29:23.1

29:27.0

makes the speaking part of it a lot
easier so des now we’re at the point

29:27.0

29:30.6

where we’ve done all of our homework
we’ve gotten to know our audience

29:30.6

29:37.1

extremely well now what can we expect
certainly so basically what we’re

29:37.1

29:42.5

talking about here is the outcomes so
what can we expect I believe that you

29:42.5

29:47.4

can expect and should expect four things
when you communicate within a audience

29:47.4

29:54.5

one is clarity and I personally believe
that clarity is king so once you go

29:54.5

29:58.7

through that process of getting to know
your audience and understanding their

29:58.7

30:03.5

current position the first thing you can
expect is clarity so you’ll have clarity

30:03.5

30:09.2

of thought as we just talked about and
you also have clarity of message which

30:09.2

30:14.6

makes it much easier for you to deliver
your presentation the second thing that

30:14.6

30:19.6

is a byproduct of that clarity is
confidence and it sort of goes back to

30:19.6

30:23.1

where we open our conversation and
talking about the fear of public

30:23.1

30:28.2

speaking in order to change that fear
into confidence it is going through this

30:28.2

30:33.0

process and I believe whether you’re in
a conversation or presentation you will

30:33.0

30:39.1

be much more confident in your delivery
the third thing is trust and this is the

30:39.1

30:43.1

thing that we seek in our personal
relationships and in our business

30:43.1

30:47.4

relationships and in any communication
that we do where we’re trying to achieve

30:47.4

30:51.8

a specific goal whether it be with our
staffs or whether it be with our

30:51.8

30:57.6

colleagues and our industry and that is
trust and Trust is critical and business

30:57.6

31:00.8

as well as it is in personal
relationships you would definitely want

31:00.8

31:04.5

to get that buy-in from people and we
alluded to different ways that you could

31:04.5

31:09.3

do that a little bit earlier and then
the last communication outcome is

31:09.3

31:15.7

influence and influence is basically
your ability to affect the thoughts and

31:15.7

31:20.9

and actions of the people that you’re
speaking to of course in a manner that’s

31:20.9

31:25.8

responsible and consistent with what you
want to accomplish in terms of your poll

31:25.8

31:32.2

so all that in a nutshell tres there’s a
lot of work that you can do upfront that

31:32.2

31:37.7

will help you on the delivery end of
your presentation and there’s a saying

31:37.7

31:42.6

that I always tell my clients the more
that you sweat and private the less you

31:42.6

31:47.8

bleed in public so then you’ve told me
that you definitely want to do that work

31:47.8

31:52.3

upfront help yourself to the extent
possible so des let me ask let’s say

31:52.3

31:58.3

that I am getting ready for some
presentation and I’ve got to go speak to

31:58.3

32:04.3

somebody and normally what I would do is
just spend all this time in a PowerPoint

32:04.3

32:08.7

and not consider anything else and
you’ve opened up everybody’s eyes and

32:08.7

32:12.0

now we’re thinking okay it’s not just
the information we’re going to be

32:12.0

32:16.7

presenting it’s now all these other
things that we have to make sure that

32:16.7

32:21.5

we’re accomplishing during this
presentation but when it comes to

32:21.5

32:27.7

actually putting a presentation together
and making sure that either your slides

32:27.7

32:32.7

are correct or what you’re saying is
correct and you’re going towards the

32:32.7

32:37.5

direction that you describe for us are
there any tips for for actually building

32:37.5

32:43.3

that absolutely well I believe that
PowerPoint should actually be the S or

32:43.3

32:48.0

the last thing that you do so the first
thing you want to do when you present

32:48.0

32:51.3

goes to something that I spoke to
earlier when we’re talking about

32:51.3

32:55.6

awareness so the first thing that you
have to do is you have to get clarity so

32:55.6

32:59.5

again what do you want the audience to
know how do you want them to feel and

32:59.5

33:04.7

what do you want them to do as a result
of listening to you speak then once you

33:04.7

33:10.5

have defined clearly what those things
are then you go through the process of

33:10.5

33:14.8

outlining I go through a two step
outlining process where the first

33:14.8

33:19.6

outline I call an ugly outline and then
the second outline I call my pretty

33:19.6

33:23.4

outline and basically what you’re doing
here is you’re just trying to get down

33:23.4

33:28.0

all the thoughts and ideas that may be
relevant to your topic and you want to

33:28.0

33:31.6

place them
when surely in a way that has a logical

33:31.6

33:37.1

flow or a way that lends itself to ease
of the audience comprehension when

33:37.1

33:41.6

you’re delivering the presentation one
of the latter steps in the process is to

33:41.6

33:45.9

actually create the PowerPoint so I see
many people when they’re doing a

33:45.9

33:49.4

presentation the first thing they do is
turn on the computer pull up the

33:49.4

33:53.3

PowerPoint they start typing in
PowerPoint or even putting pictures in

33:53.3

33:59.0

and I just believe that that’s the last
thing that you should do so my process

33:59.0

34:04.2

goes from number one getting clarity
about you know what I want to accomplish

34:04.2

34:09.5

with the audience number two is
interviewing the audience or finally not

34:09.5

34:13.9

as much information as possible about
what the audience currently believes and

34:13.9

34:20.8

how they behave in relation to my topic
once I have that information that I list

34:20.8

34:24.9

out you know all the points and sub
points that I think that may be

34:24.9

34:29.5

important I organize those into a
logical sequence which eventually

34:29.5

34:34.7

becomes a script so I believe in
full-out scripting the presentation and

34:34.7

34:38.2

then from there we can create the
PowerPoint and the visuals that will

34:38.2

34:43.5

support what it is you’re speaking about
does when I think back of good

34:43.5

34:49.7

presentations and bad presentations the
good ones used PowerPoint in a

34:49.7

34:54.8

particular way that that just really
made their presentations pop and drove

34:54.8

34:59.9

home the message they were trying to to
get to the bad ones were they simply

34:59.9

35:05.8

read what was on their PowerPoint slides
I can’t stand that it’s hard to stay

35:05.8

35:09.5

awake during that or just send me the
PowerPoint and I don’t need to go

35:09.5

35:13.2

because all of everything that you’re
going to say is there so we all want to

35:13.2

35:17.7

get away from that what’s the best way
to use PowerPoint I wonder a couple of

35:17.7

35:23.1

tips so we could use PowerPoint better
absolutely so the goal for PowerPoint is

35:23.1

35:28.4

started a fundamental level your
PowerPoint slides should complement your

35:28.4

35:34.5

presentation as opposed to compete with
your presentation so PowerPoint is

35:34.5

35:39.3

designed to enhance the presentation but
most people use it in a way where it’s

35:39.3

35:44.4

in competition with the presenter what I
mean by that is when people have slides

35:44.4

35:49.5

that are full of words as the industry
describes as death by PowerPoint what

35:49.5

35:53.5

the presenter is asking you to do is to
make a choice do I read all the

35:53.5

35:58.5

information that you have on that slide
or do I listen to you and that is the

35:58.5

36:04.4

exact opposite of what you want to do so
as a rule the best thing to do with

36:04.4

36:09.6

PowerPoint is to just have an image and
no words on the slide that will be the

36:09.6

36:13.6

goal of course that’s not always
achievable because you need sometimes

36:13.6

36:17.9

worse to help explain what you’re
talking about but as a starting point

36:17.9

36:23.0

start with just the image and then add
as few words as possible most people do

36:23.0

36:26.8

the exact opposite pick add as many
words as possible and then they just

36:26.8

36:30.9

throw on an image if they have time so
the first thing I would suggest is just

36:30.9

36:35.5

start with an image the old adage that a
picture is worth a thousand words if you

36:35.5

36:39.9

can throw up a picture of the technology
that you’re talking about or the system

36:39.9

36:43.2

that you’re talking about to help
enhance what you’re saying to the

36:43.2

36:47.9

audience and just the picture alone will
do it then you’re in the sweet spot when

36:47.9

36:52.0

it comes to your presentation so that’s
the first tip the second tip I would say

36:52.0

36:57.0

is our most remote controls for
PowerPoint there is a button that will

36:57.0

37:01.5

allow you to black out the slide meaning
that it will totally take away the

37:01.5

37:06.4

picture another thing that you could do
is to add black slides into your

37:06.4

37:10.2

presentation that make the screen go
completely black

37:10.2

37:14.2

so what this does whether you use a
remote control or either if you add

37:14.2

37:19.0

black slides into your presentation
which I prefer to do is it forces the

37:19.0

37:23.7

audience’s attention back to you as a
speaker so there’s nothing on the screen

37:23.7

37:26.5

for the audience to look at they’re
naturally going to turn their attention

37:26.5

37:30.3

to you as the presenter
and so what you want to do is make sure

37:30.3

37:35.1

that your presentation and the
PowerPoint are tightly choreographed so

37:35.1

37:39.6

that you can control the audience’s
attention in terms of them looking at

37:39.6

37:42.7

you and focusing on what you’re saying
versus

37:42.7

37:47.9

actually looking at the slide I have
seen you do this very thing and it is

37:47.9

37:53.2

amazing how you use PowerPoint and and I
never we thought about it when I was

37:53.2

37:56.4

watching you
wasn’t thinking do I read the slide or

37:56.4

38:00.0

do I watch this because you didn’t give
me that option I had to watch des

38:00.0

38:05.0

because there was no slide absolutely
and that in terms of clarity and

38:05.0

38:10.0

understandings if that simple tip alone
can change your presentation drastically

38:10.0

38:13.7

a lot of presenters make the mistake of
you know they leave their last slide up

38:13.7

38:17.6

until they’re ready to go into the next
slide and so when that slide is there

38:17.6

38:22.0

the audience can read it they can study
it it may even encourage them to pull

38:22.0

38:25.6

out their phones to see if what’s really
on the slide is true you know they want

38:25.6

38:29.2

to test her information sometimes so you
want to eliminate as many distractions

38:29.2

38:33.7

as possible and so by either using the
blackout button or your remote or

38:33.7

38:38.0

incorporating black slides into your
presentation it helps tremendously with

38:38.0

38:39.9

that
what does let me ask you this let’s say

38:39.9

38:44.5

it’s a highly technical presentation and
somebody wants to get all that

38:44.5

38:48.7

information on there for their reference
because they know they can’t talk about

38:48.7

38:54.1

it all how do you deal with that yeah so
that happens quite often and one of the

38:54.1

38:59.9

things that I suggest is to create two
PowerPoint decks so one PowerPoint that

38:59.9

39:03.4

would be the one that you actually
showed the audience and then the other

39:03.4

39:07.7

PowerPoint that would be one that you
print out and you give to the audience

39:07.7

39:13.6

after your presentation not before but
after your presentation so the one that

39:13.6

39:19.1

the audience sees would not have all of
the granular level of detail because a

39:19.1

39:23.0

lot of times there’s not time to go
through that in the presentation but on

39:23.0

39:27.9

the other hand that information may be
important to them so when you create two

39:27.9

39:32.1

decks the deck that has the details they
can take that with them and if they want

39:32.1

39:35.7

to refer to it later after the
presentation then they can look at it

39:35.7

39:39.7

and they’ll have that information
available to them now if it’s a

39:39.7

39:43.2

situation where you’re presenting and
you’re like okay there’s no way around

39:43.2

39:47.8

me having all this highly technical
information on the screen I gotta have

39:47.8

39:52.5

it here so that the audience understands
it what I would suggest is that you

39:52.5

39:57.9

manage the audience’s expectation so for
example you click the slide and it comes

39:57.9

40:01.9

up and it has all of these different
machines and pipes and things like that

40:01.9

40:05.7

and arrows pointing to different things
the way that I would address that

40:05.7

40:08.7

particular slide is I will say to the
audience

40:08.7

40:13.9

hey I know that there’s a ton of
information on this slide and it can be

40:13.9

40:18.7

a bit overwhelming but let me draw your
attention to this machine over here in

40:18.7

40:22.4

the top left corner we’re going to talk
about that first then I will talk about

40:22.4

40:26.2

that particular machine and then I would
move to whatever the next machine or

40:26.2

40:30.7

system I wanted to show them so I would
use my voice to guide the audience

40:30.7

40:35.2

through the slide and I would tell them
or clued them as to what they need to

40:35.2

40:40.1

look at as we go on but by Framing it in
the beginning to say here that there’s a

40:40.1

40:43.9

lot of things going on here and I’m
going to serve as a tour guide and sort

40:43.9

40:49.3

of walk you through this process makes
it much easier for the audience and I’ve

40:49.3

40:53.4

found that it causes them to listen to
the speaker a little bit more because

40:53.4

40:57.0

they want to know you know what things
on that particular slide are important

40:57.0

41:02.2

des that is just fantastic advice and I
have struggled with this probably more

41:02.2

41:07.4

than anything so I’m learning along with
the Scaling UP! Nation and I appreciate

41:07.4

41:12.4

that tip that is amazing praise one more
quick thing to that point there’s also

41:12.4

41:17.3

what you can do is that you can use the
zoom in zoom out feature on the slide so

41:17.3

41:22.2

if you were to zoom in on the picture
and a particular portion what I like to

41:22.2

41:26.4

do is I’ll show them the whole picture
so it looks like okay you can see how

41:26.4

41:30.4

this thing looks from 30,000 feet and
then just explain to them we’re going to

41:30.4

41:35.3

zoom in on certain pieces and you may
have you know three or four slides that

41:35.3

41:40.5

have the exact same image on it but
they’re just shown closer so that way it

41:40.5

41:43.3

will give the appearance that you’re
zooming in all the things that are

41:43.3

41:48.0

important and then at the end we go back
to that 30,000 foot view so it also

41:48.0

41:51.8

makes the audience kind of feel like
they had an experience so that’s another

41:51.8

41:55.5

trick that you can do when there’s a lot
of detailed information on one

41:55.5

42:00.1

particular slide great stuff
well des you said that every

42:00.1

42:04.9

presentation needs to have that one
thing that the communicator wants the

42:04.9

42:10.0

audience to get so today’s podcast
interview what’s the one thing that you

42:10.0

42:13.8

want the Scaling UP! Nation to get the
one thing that’s important for the

42:13.8

42:19.1

Scaling UP! Nation to take from our time
together here at race is the fact that

42:19.1

42:25.5

you got to do your homework of
and the more that you understand your

42:25.5

42:29.9

audience and the more that you’re clear
about what you want to communicate to

42:29.9

42:34.3

that audience before you actually
present then you’ll see a direct

42:34.3

42:39.1

correlation in your performance whether
it’s a one-on-one situation or you’re

42:39.1

42:44.5

speaking to an audience it’s always
amazing to me how much you can alleviate

42:44.5

42:49.9

the stress and anxiety of a presentation
if you just do some of these simple

42:49.9

42:55.3

things upfront and there you have it
well Dez we’re not quite done yeah I’ve

42:55.3

42:59.7

got some lightning round questions to
ask you so are you ready for those sir I

42:59.7

43:05.7

think I’m ready all right you know that
I am a huge Back to the Future fan and

43:05.7

43:10.7

if I had a DeLorean it of course would
come equipped with a flux capacitor and

43:10.7

43:14.9

as you are coming on a ride of the flux
capacitor and the DeLorean with me and

43:14.9

43:19.8

we are setting the time circuits back to
the first day where you became a

43:19.8

43:25.4

professional speaker what advice would
you give yourself I would tell myself

43:25.4

43:32.5

that everything matters when it comes to
a presentation everything matters it’s

43:32.5

43:38.8

home run or nothing it took me a while
to come to that focusing on different

43:38.8

43:42.5

parts of the presentation like the
opening or making sure that this part

43:42.5

43:47.7

was clear and through those trials what
I learned was you know I was missing the

43:47.7

43:52.7

audience and I couldn’t figure out why
and over time once I was able to put all

43:52.7

43:56.9

of the pieces together that was the
point where I started to get traction

43:56.9

44:01.5

and get responses from the audiences and
people understood what I was talking

44:01.5

44:07.4

about or I can make them laugh and so
what I would say to myself on my first

44:07.4

44:13.5

day is that everything matters what’s
the last book that you’ve read the last

44:13.5

44:20.5

book that I read was the million dollar
maverick by Allen Weiss we’ve had some

44:20.5

44:25.9

other guests say that they’ve read that
book as well and Dez there’s going to be

44:25.9

44:30.2

no surprise someday we’re going to go to
the movie theater and there’s going to

44:30.2

44:35.8

be a movie about Dez Thornton who plays
Dez

44:35.8

44:41.7

I would have to say Forest Whitaker
Forest Whitaker is one of my favorite

44:41.7

44:47.9

actors very versatile always comes
across as strong and determined

44:47.9

44:53.2

on-screen and interestingly we share the
same birthday so definitely Forest

44:53.2

44:58.3

Whitaker well there you go
and my last question is if you could

44:58.3

45:03.5

talk to Eddie body throughout history
who would it be with and why if I had

45:03.5

45:08.2

that privilege to talk to anyone
throughout history without question it

45:08.2

45:16.3

would be nelson mandela mandela was such
a simple yet complex man all at the same

45:16.3

45:23.3

time what I admire most about him was
his ability to put the good of the group

45:23.3

45:31.0

or of the whole above his personal
objectives and motivations and the way

45:31.0

45:35.7

that he communicated that once he was
released from prison and developed

45:35.7

45:41.3

apartheid in South Africa I’ve read and
studied him quite a bit and would be

45:41.3

45:47.2

infinitely curious to know or about me
but as this has been very informative

45:47.2

45:52.0

for me I know people in the Scaling UP!
Nation cannot wait to go to my show

45:52.0

45:56.6

notes page and find things that we
talked about today if it’s not enough

45:56.6

46:01.8

for them and they want to learn more
about you and your process where should

46:01.8

46:09.7

they go so very simply you can find me
at des Darnton calm on the web SD easy

46:09.7

46:18.1

th are in te o in and I am so honored to
be a guest and to hang out with

46:18.1

46:22.0

Scaling UP!
Nation and to be introduced to the one

46:22.0

46:26.7

of treatment industry for the first time
so choice thank you so much for the

46:26.7

46:29.9

opportunity to be here it absolutely was
my pleasure

46:29.9

46:36.0

scout up nation I am going to confess
that when I start writing a presentation

46:36.0

46:43.6

I start with PowerPoint des says don’t
do that and des I’m sorry it’s a bad

46:43.6

46:48.7

habit I need to figure out how not to do
that but I’ve been using PowerPoint for

46:48.7

46:52.7

so long
it allows me to organize my thoughts and

46:52.7

46:58.2

then I can shuffle slides around so I’m
hoping that I’m doing your ugly pretty

46:58.2

47:03.8

outline that you had spoken earlier in
our interview with PowerPoint I will

47:03.8

47:09.8

tell you since you and I have met I use
PowerPoint a lot less now every time I

47:09.8

47:15.0

speak I try to use a PowerPoint but I
don’t have what I’m saying on the slides

47:15.0

47:21.9

anymore I try to enhance what I’m saying
with a picture that allows people to

47:21.9

47:26.8

visualize what I’m talking about and I
got to tell you folks since I’ve been

47:26.8

47:32.0

doing that I have been getting much
better reviews about the things that I

47:32.0

47:38.8

have spoken about now I love the fact
that death says you need to analyze what

47:38.8

47:45.8

does your audience know before you start
speaking to them that was huge to me and

47:45.8

47:51.3

then the next question was what do you
want them to know after you finished

47:51.3

47:58.0

speaking and those two things lead to
what behavior do you want to change that

47:58.0

48:03.4

your audience is doing folks there is no
secret about it one of the reasons that

48:03.4

48:09.7

I started this podcast is because I have
seen so much bad water treatment out

48:09.7

48:14.7

there and I know that we are all good
people and we all want to do better but

48:14.7

48:19.3

sometimes we’re so busy working in the
day to day we don’t have time to get

48:19.3

48:25.1

better and our industry is better than
that you’ve heard me say before that if

48:25.1

48:30.7

we’re gonna be in this industry we need
to make this industry better because we

48:30.7

48:36.0

are in it and folks that’s the behavior
that I wanted to change with this

48:36.0

48:41.5

podcast I want to be that slight nudge
that gets us all a little bit better and

48:41.5

48:46.6

the entire industry is better for it for
that little thing that you change now

48:46.6

48:52.3

the entire industry is better for that
change and of course you know that I

48:52.3

49:00.0

look at sales as communication so Dez’s
entire interview wasn’t about how do we

49:00.0

49:03.5

sell
because if we can’t communicate what

49:03.5

49:09.2

we’re trying to do in a way that people
want us to do it we are not going to be

49:09.2

49:16.1

successful so it’s not sales it’s
communication so what selling behavior

49:16.1

49:22.8

do you want your potential customer to
change what problem are you trying to

49:22.8

49:28.5

convey that they have that they might
not know that they have that’s a big

49:28.5

49:33.2

problem and they might not even know
about it and you can help them with that

49:33.2

49:40.0

Dez I just think it is so awesome what
you do and how you help people become a

49:40.0

49:44.7

better speaker I got to tell you one of
the things that not that I am a good

49:44.7

49:48.3

speaker by any means just listen to the
podcast and you could probably have

49:48.3

49:54.5

evidence of that but by doing this
podcast by recording how I speak I am

49:54.5

50:00.7

now a better speaker now I still do not
speak perfectly and on I listen back at

50:00.7

50:05.8

some of my episodes I misspeak all the
time but I will tell you that there is

50:05.8

50:12.4

some magic to recording yourself and
then playing it back and that way you’ve

50:12.4

50:18.4

got a timestamp of how you spoke at a
certain time and you know what to work

50:18.4

50:24.7

on to make yourself a little bit better
so what are you doing so you can be a

50:24.7

50:29.9

better communicator ie a better speaker
some of the things I like to do is

50:29.9

50:34.2

practice in front of an audience of
course it’s great a lot of people say

50:34.2

50:39.3

practice in front of a mirror or just
practice to yourself but folks Dez

50:39.3

50:44.6

nailed it right on the head whenever I
am nervous it’s not necessarily about

50:44.6

50:50.5

what I am doing it’s about what the
audience is going to expect from me and

50:50.5

50:55.1

questions they’re gonna ask and maybe
I’m not prepared for those things so

50:55.1

51:00.2

when you can present in front of a live
audience and these are peers that you

51:00.2

51:04.8

trust and probably peers in the industry
they’re going to ask you harder

51:04.8

51:09.7

questions than your audience is probably
going to ask you so that gets you really

51:09.7

51:13.9

prepared another thing you can do is
work with a coach like Dez

51:13.9

51:19.6

they can help prepare you for speaking
in front of some sort of engagement or

51:19.6

51:23.6

just making a sales presentation there
are a lot of groups out there

51:23.6

51:27.8

one is Toastmasters now I gotta tell you
I’ve never been to Toastmasters but I’ve

51:27.8

51:33.1

met a lot of people that speak very
highly of Toastmasters and that’s where

51:33.1

51:36.3

a group of people get together and I
think they learn how to publicly speak

51:36.3

51:39.5

again I’ve never been to one of these
but that’s what I think they do and I

51:39.5

51:44.4

know that they have chapters all over so
maybe that’s what you should consider

51:44.4

51:47.9

go online look up Toastmasters and I’m
willing to bet within a 10-mile radius

51:47.9

51:53.1

there’s a spot that Toastmasters is
meeting and you can go there and learn

51:53.1

51:57.3

more about it
Scaling UP! Nation I have shared this

51:57.3

52:03.5

story with you before company owners
will come up to me and they will ask me

52:03.5

52:09.4

what are some tips that they can do that
when they send their valued employees to

52:09.4

52:14.0

presentations and trainings and they’re
gonna spend some money on sending those

52:14.0

52:18.5

people there how do they make sure that
they get an ROI back on that investment

52:18.5

52:23.6

and what are my favorite things to tell
them is don’t send them as a student

52:23.6

52:30.8

send them as a teacher as a future
teacher and maybe what you do is you get

52:30.8

52:35.3

out the syllabus and you look at that
together with them and you choose a

52:35.3

52:40.7

couple of topics that you want to make
sure that they become the expert on and

52:40.7

52:47.1

now when they come back to the office
after going to this presentation they

52:47.1

52:53.9

are in charge of teaching that topic to
the entire company I love to recommend

52:53.9

52:58.8

that because two things happen
it changes the responsibility from I’m

52:58.8

53:05.8

now sending you you go learn too now my
boss has sent me and now I’m expected to

53:05.8

53:09.3

do something with it so that’s the
paradigm shift there but the big

53:09.3

53:13.3

paradigm shift is the person that’s
attending that seminar

53:13.3

53:19.5

they are not there as a student anymore
they are there as a future teacher and I

53:19.5

53:24.3

promise they will pay attention and take
notes and ask questions differently

53:24.3

53:30.0

because they are expect
to teach that topic and folks when you

53:30.0

53:35.5

do that that is a little mini
presentation that you can do in front of

53:35.5

53:41.7

your company that will allow you to get
better not only at presenting but also

53:41.7

53:45.7

the topic that you’re trying to learn
about so if you’re not doing this

53:45.7

53:52.2

already I would ask that company owners
you start requiring your employees to

53:52.2

53:57.9

train your other employees about topics
they’ll enjoy it more they will get more

53:57.9

54:03.1

out at their presentation skills will
get better and it will raise the bar all

54:03.1

54:09.0

across your company now for you people
out there that work for somebody don’t

54:09.0

54:14.1

wait for them to assign it to you bring
this idea to them I guarantee that

54:14.1

54:17.4

they’re gonna love it
and I guarantee that your company will

54:17.4

54:22.9

be better because you are doing that and
like I said everybody’s presentation

54:22.9

54:29.0

skills are going to get better nation I
got to tell you I love it when you write

54:29.0

54:33.8

in to me or you send me a voicemail and
you let me know that this show has done

54:33.8

54:38.4

something for you I love all the
response that I have received that we

54:38.4

54:42.6

have gone weekly and you absolutely love
that and you needed it to go weekly

54:42.6

54:46.8

because you needed to be inspired on a
weekly basis I am so happy that this

54:46.8

54:52.0

show can do that for you and I am happy
that I can bring it to you weekly in

54:52.0

54:57.3

order to bring Scaling UP! H2O to you
weekly I do have an ask

54:57.3

55:04.0

I’ve got several asks the first one is I
am going through my book of questions a

55:04.0

55:09.6

lot quicker now so it is imperative that
you help me replenish those just like

55:09.6

55:15.0

micro on Dirty Jobs used to say on each
and every episode if you did not let him

55:15.0

55:20.5

know what his next dirty job was his
entire crew including him was out of a

55:20.5

55:25.0

job I don’t want to get that far I’m
asking you well in advance please let me

55:25.0

55:30.4

know what questions you want me to
answer on my show you can do that one of

55:30.4

55:35.5

two ways you can go to https://scalinguph2o.com and record a voicemail where you

55:35.5

55:39.8

can hear your voice potentially on
Scaling UP! H2O asking

55:39.8

55:44.7

question that we will answer or you can
go to the show ideas page and just

55:44.7

55:51.0

simply send me an email also let me know
what guess you want me to interview one

55:51.0

55:54.9

of the things that I think is just so
incredible is when I started this show

55:54.9

56:00.9

it was a very narrow focus on the type
of industrial water treatment that I

56:00.9

56:05.5

practice two years later almost two
years late not even two years later

56:05.5

56:10.1

about a year and a half I think it is a
little bit more than that we have

56:10.1

56:16.2

expanded to the entire water treatment
industry and you might have noticed that

56:16.2

56:21.2

I am expanding the topics that we are
talking about so we can cover more in

56:21.2

56:26.2

the water treatment industry so I need
to know who I should be talking with

56:26.2

56:31.1

because I might not know these people I
want to get to know them and I want to

56:31.1

56:34.8

bring them to you so please help me with
that of course another thing you can do

56:34.8

56:39.2

is you can connect with me on social
media you can look for Trace Blackmore

56:39.2

56:44.6

you can look for Scaling UP! H2O that’s
where I bring a lot of content and tips

56:44.6

56:50.0

to you so you’ll be the first to know if
you do that and then also my final ask

56:50.0

56:55.8

is that you share this podcast with
other water treaters so we can all scale

56:55.8

57:00.6

up on knowledge together folks thanks so
much for allowing me to have this

57:00.6

57:05.1

opportunity to come to you each and
every week and it’s my hope that you

57:05.1

57:13.7

have a great week until I talk to you
next time on Scaling UP! H2O

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