99 Transcript

099 The One About Health Insurance


Transcript Disclaimer: This Transcript is provided and copied from YouTube, grammar and mistakes are present.


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welcome to Scaling UP! h2o the podcast
where we’re Scaling UP! on knowledge so

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we don’t Scaling UP! our systems
hello Scaling UP! nation Trace Blackmore

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here your host for Scaling UP! nation
I got to tell you if there is one topic

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0:28.0

out there that I just don’t understand
and every time I try to understand it I

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0:33.6

get more and more confused it’s health
insurance and for those small business

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0:39.5

owners out there for those people that
are working in a small company you know

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0:44.4

what I’m talking about everybody out
there needs access to health care but

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0:50.8

not everybody out there can afford the
plans that we all want now how do we go

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0:57.1

navigating through that sea of plans and
all the alphabet soup that they use to

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1:02.6

explain plans all these different
acronyms out there it is so confusing

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you almost have to take on a separate
full-time job to be able to understand

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1:13.1

all the plans out there and then even if
you’ve done that you’re still guessing

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that when the end comes and you’ve
picked a plan is that truly the best

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1:24.2

plan for you and your company well folks
I’ve got somebody that has taken all of

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the guesswork out of that they speak
that language and they cross the barrier

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1:36.2

between healthcare insurance and small
business she’s delightful to talk to and

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1:42.5

I know you’re going to get a lot out of
today’s episode that being said for

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1:48.3

those of you out there that are not
owners of your company it’s important

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1:54.2

for you to understand that your employer
wants to take care of you I know you

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work for a high quality individual and a
high quality company and there is

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2:03.9

nothing more that that company would
like to do but take care of you and your

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2:08.9

family there are just so many
constraints out there that don’t allow

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2:14.1

business owners to give the care that
the employees want so I want you to

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2:18.6

understand from their perspective
they’re trying what I’m trying to do in

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2:24.5

this episode is educate both sides of
that fence so we can all learn together

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and hopefully through that we can come
up with solutions together that we can

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all get what we need and want with all
of that said please welcome my guest

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Alison de Polly my lab partner today is
Alison and de Polly and Alison you and I

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are going to be talking about the most
exciting topic out there health

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2:52.3

insurance yes we are
a I’m a small business owner and there

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2:57.4

are a lot of people that listen to
Scaling UP! h2o that our small business

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3:01.6

owners are they work for small
businesses and I will tell you if there

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3:08.2

is any chant that we all have is that it
is so difficult to find good or right

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3:12.6

health care insurance when you’re a
certain size have you found that to be

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3:16.4

true across the board that is true
across the board the smaller you are the

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3:22.1

more challenging it is well I am so
looking forward to talking about this

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issue because it’s an issue that plagues
my company and I know a lot of people

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3:28.7

that I’m friends with it plagues them as
well but before we get in that

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3:32.1

conversation do you mind telling the
Scaling UP! nation a little about

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3:36.4

yourself sure so first it’s a pleasure
to be here today thank you for having me

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3:42.2

I’ve been in some part of the health
insurance or benefits business for a

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very long time much longer than I like
to say both as part of a family benefits

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3:52.9

business we were a boutique firm that
did a lot of self-funding arrangements

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3:57.3

then I moved into some other areas of
the benefits arena I also own an

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4:02.1

enrollment firm so we help get employees
enrolled in all of their benefits and

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4:06.5

now I’ve moved back over the last couple
of years back into the benefits space

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4:12.2

after learning about how many things you
actually can do to help control your

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4:16.1

costs it’s not kind of an all-or-nothing
proposition and that’s where we are

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today well I am looking forward to using
all of the knowledge that you have

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towards this issue because I it’s very
frustrating to me

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I can’t offer the benefits that I want
to offer my employees because of our

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4:37.7

size and then the benefits that we are
able to offer are so incredibly

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4:42.2

expensive and they’re not really that
good so I’m not really sure where to

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4:46.6

start this conversation do we you just
start giving me advice or do you want we

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4:51.5

can we can make it for the innovations
but I gotta tell you it’s an issue and

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then you know we have all this
government getting involved and then are

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4:58.3

they going to take care of it are they
not going to take care of it don’t look

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like they’re doing a very good job so
far so what is the small business owner

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to do I would encourage all small
business owners to think a little bit

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outside the box so we always think of
health care or health as a social issue

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and not a for-profit situation right you
know we think we should go to the doctor

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and care is important and people should
have access to care and I agree with all

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of that but all of us need to make money
right so it is the job of the insurance

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company to make money it is not the job
of the insurance company to control your

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5:41.2

cost and once people understand that
they’re a little freer to think well

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okay how is it that I can control my
cost so with the reform and innovation

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that we’ve seen in the last few years
even small employers can now access cost

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containment tools and that may be as
simple as moving into a level funded

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plan and I’ll tell you what that is in
just a second – moving into something

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like direct primary care which can be
such a benefit to so many companies and

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everything in between so you know the
world is your oyster now in terms of

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what you’re doing with your health
insurance plan you don’t have to just

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stay with the big insurance company and
the further you get away from the big

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insurance company you can contain your
costs the downside to that is when you

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move away from the big insurance company
you move away from the Community Rating

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issues particularly as a small employer
and that’s part of the challenge as a

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small employer your community rated
you’re really you’re the only

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seeing that’s particular to your group
is you know your age mix and your gender

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mix otherwise it’s everybody in your
community that is is rated it the same

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way and that’s why a young healthy group
pays a lot and so does an older

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unhealthy group does that make sense to
you it absolutely does make sense now

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the question I do have is where does
someone get started is it our local

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insurance agent that we have a
relationship with do we then go online I

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mean what do we do where do we start I
would all of the above I would encourage

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you always to start with your the broker
that you work with now they know you

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they know your group you’re probably
satisfied with them as a business owner

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outside of this kind of uncontainable
cost business ask them some questions

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about if there are any alternative plans
if they do level funding if they work

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with any of the health sharing
arrangements if they do any of the

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non-traditional things and if you don’t
get answers that you like go online and

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and see what else you find not everybody
works in the most cost containment areas

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so check around and see what you find
and even if you’re small ten twelve

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fifteen employees there are
opportunities for you to control your

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8:00.3

costs and what exactly should we be
looking for what plans are available out

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there what’s within a small companies
reach which what’s in a larger companies

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reach what are all the options out there
so when you have a lot of employees you

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have a much bigger pool to spread your
risk out right so and that’s always been

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the challenge for smaller employers is
that there’s not a lot of risk spreading

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you know it’s your group of your five or
your ten or your twenty and that that’s

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8:28.0

a much smaller risk pool than you know
100 or 500 or 5,000 now there are

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third-party administrators which is
basically the administrative arm that an

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insurance company would normally provide
that will have access to private risk

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pools that you can belong to if you’re a
smaller employer or you can work with at

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EPA that has a level funding option
where to me that’s the best of both

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worlds
it to the employer and to the employees

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it looks just like a
regular insurance plan but it works like

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a self-funded plan and what that means
is there’s a specific deductible that is

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fairly large ten or twenty or forty
thousand dollars which sounds awful it’s

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not give me a second then everything
else is taken care of by the reinsurance

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and the TPA manages that process for the
employer the level funding means that

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the employer pays a set amount every
month because as a small employer you

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can’t pay a low amount one month and a
higher amount the next month as the

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claims come in you pay the same amount
every month and if there’s any premium

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over left over at the end of the year
for the claims you can apply that to

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next year’s claims or you can get that
back

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it helps stabilize the rate increases
and it means that you’re only paying for

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the care that you actually use well that
sounds interesting I’ve never even heard

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about that option how would somebody
find out more about that so I have some

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tools at my website and we’ve created a
landing page for you and I’m sure we’ll

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talk about that at the end for somebody
that is just sitting at their computer

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listening to this Google level funding
health insurance level funding and

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you’ll get some nice primers and
probably directed some companies that do

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that for smaller employers well let’s
talk about another common issue that I

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hear from business owners time and time
again they will offer a benefits package

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10:17.1

to their employees and then the
following year will come up they will

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get this exorbitant rate increase and
then they won’t be able to afford it or

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they can’t afford to pay for the entire
family so they say if you want the rest

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10:30.9

of your family on the plan you’ll have
to pay for them I’ll just pay for you

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10:36.4

but the employee just sees that as the
employer isn’t paying as much as they

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10:41.6

used to for his family how do we have
those conversations with the employees

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so they truly understand what’s going on
and then what can we do year-to-year to

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try to prevent that from happening
there’s a couple of things so first I

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believe in transparency of cost and I
think that a frank conversation about

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11:01.0

what health insurance costs with
employees is important to have you know

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it used to cost 150 dollars on two
hundred dollars two hundred and fifty

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dollars
or health insurance for an employee now

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you’re very fortunate if you can cover
an employee for even a not-so-great plan

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for under 450 or $500 or seven or $800
depending on where you live and that’s

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the employee only never mind the family
that’s a big nut for small employers to

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crack so I think a frank conversation
about it and also a frank conversation

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about what care costs and where people
should be getting their care now when

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you’re in a fully insured arrangement it
almost doesn’t matter because your

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community rated and the the rates
increase average seven to fifteen

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percent year over year health insurance
costs will double if nothing is done in

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the next ten years is that something
that’s sustainable for business no it’s

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not so have a frank conversation about
what health health insurance because

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health insurance is not healthcare what
health insurance costs and then seek out

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some alternatives that will allow you to
control some of those costs and that

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could be as simple as adding a 24-hour
concierge to your plan and telehealth or

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12:19.0

a concierge doctor into your plan I know
it sounds crazy but often doing those

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things will pull 80 percent of your
claims out of your plan because 80

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percent of your care is normally
delivered in a primary care setting and

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a concierge doctor is available 24 hours
a day and they can help you with

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medications and getting where you need
to go if you need extra lab work tests

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12:43.0

all of that kind of thing so that’s one
solution it’s just a tool but it is one

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of several tools that’s available for
you

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let’s talk a little bit about that there
are some listeners out there I’m sure

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that I’ve never heard the term concierge
doctor what exactly is that a concierge

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doctor is like an old-time doctor that
saw you you were his patient he knew you

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13:04.0

he knew your family he knew your medical
history he knew how you know your whole

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13:08.4

socio-economic situation social
determinants of health are a big deal

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13:12.8

and made sure that you got the care that
you need and if you needed something

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13:17.1

else he helped you get to the something
else that you need it I know some plans

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have the ability where you go on and
and then you talk with somebody online

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13:25.5

is that what you’re talking about well
personally that’s one of my favorite

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13:29.3

things because I hate to go to the
doctor but that’s not quite what I’m

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13:34.3

talking about so I would encourage the
use of telehealth quite a lot it is a

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13:40.7

cost effective timely efficient way for
people to get immediate information when

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13:44.8

they need it you know if you have I get
a sinus infection every year I can’t

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13:49.0

stand to go to the doctor for that I
called telehealth and I’m like hello I

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13:53.0

have a sinus infection I have this this
this this symptom they’re like oh yes

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13:56.4

you have a sinus infection
let us call in these medications for you

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so that is at its base level incredibly
easy and efficient from a cost

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standpoint if you talk to a doctor you
may see the doctor depending on what

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state you’re in and that will pull the
cost of that claim out of your health

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plan so you’re not penalized for it so
that’s kind of a cost containment on the

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other side of that one I don’t have to
go to the doctor I can call it 2:00 in

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the afternoon or 2:00 in the morning if
I would like to and 2 if I’m a young

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14:29.4

family or I have an unhealthy person in
my household that’s having a situation

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14:33.3

and my child is having you know
projectile vomiting at two o’clock in

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14:36.1

the morning because you know it’s a law
it only happens at 2 o’clock in the

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14:40.3

morning or I have a family member who
may be having a heart attack or a stroke

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14:45.4

but I’m not sure I can call that
telehealth get an immediate answer and

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14:50.8

know if I have to go seek other care or
if I can remain where I am or what I

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14:54.8

need to do if I just need to go see the
doctor in the morning so that allows you

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15:00.3

some freedom to get have people get care
when they need it and stay out of the

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15:04.2

emergency room which is the most
expensive place to treat people so that

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15:10.1

at its base form is telehealth concierge
or direct primary care is the next

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15:14.3

version of that you do have access to
the doctor 24 hours a day but you can go

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15:18.0

visit him during the day during his
office hours but you can call him at

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15:22.4

night or you know however you engage
with your physician and there is a

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15:28.6

direct monthly cost for that there’s no
insurance per se involved so like the

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15:32.5

old-time doctor that you paid directly
and you get all those benefits of

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15:35.3

somebody you have
medical home you have a doctor that

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15:39.1

knows who you are in your history and
what medications you take and kind of

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15:42.5

what your personal tendencies are and
what your family situation is and

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15:47.3

probably sees the rest of your family
members it’s a very nice environment to

15:47.3

15:51.4

have yeah that seems like the way you
want to see a doctor but I’m surprised

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15:57.4

you say that can actually lower our our
healthcare plan rates how is that well

15:57.4

16:01.8

because you’re paying the doctor a fee
every month and you know normally that

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16:07.6

that cost is $100 or less usually it’s
less in the east on the coast it might

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16:13.3

be a little bit more but normally you’re
in the 40 50 $80 range for an employee

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16:18.1

to have access had to have a access to a
direct primary care and none of those

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16:22.1

claims are going against your health
plan very interesting that’s why you’re

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16:26.9

the expert I’ve also heard of
individuals either joining associations

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16:31.5

or a health care sharing plan can you
talk a little bit about those two I

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16:37.8

can’t so an association plan would be a
plan that is set up for an association

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16:43.9

and usually an insurance company or a
TPA a third party administrator will go

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16:48.3

to an association and say we can do this
for all of your members and the members

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16:52.4

access the plan the reason you would
want to do that is you’ve got a bigger

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16:56.4

pool to spread out the risk there is a
commonality there has to be a

16:56.4

17:00.4

commonality among all the members and
usually they’ll give you some

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17:06.2

underwriting concessions for having
access to the whole pool so like I work

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17:11.4

with an association or affinity plan
with a marketing association so all of

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17:17.6

their members can access this plan and
in return for access to all of the

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17:21.5

members the third party administrator
has made some underwriting concessions

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17:26.5

in terms of group size so normally their
minimum group size is 10 they’ve gone

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17:31.3

down to 3 and they do offer some you
know more favorable rates because it’s a

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17:36.6

bigger risk pool so that would be an
association or an affinity plan a health

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17:41.7

sharing arrangement is something
completely different and it is much more

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17:46.0

common in the mid
than it is on the coasts so a he’ll

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17:53.0

sharing arrangements started out on a
more religious basis and it is a group

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17:57.6

of people used to get that through your
church now it’s delivered in some other

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18:04.2

ways and you you belong to the pool and
you paid X amount of dollars every month

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18:07.9

to the to the health sharing arrangement
and there was an administrator of the

18:07.9

18:13.2

health sharing arrangement a need would
be a medical event as a medical event

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18:17.9

happens then you would be told okay work
we’re using this much money to cover the

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18:23.2

medical need it is not a compares no
contractual basis no obligation to pay

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18:30.6

for care and but the cost generally tend
to be quite low and I I know that sounds

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18:36.2

very odd or very disconcerting for some
people I have seen it work beautifully

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18:40.4

for many many people well Allison I
think the Scaling UP! nation has a good

18:40.4

18:46.9

idea of what plans are available for
them out there let’s say we go out there

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18:52.1

we talk to some people like yourself we
now have an array of plan options right

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18:55.5

in front of us how do we go about
deciding which is the right plan for our

18:55.5

19:00.6

company sure you know I think different
companies have different means and so

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19:05.5

you really need to be clear on what it
is that you need is a rich plan the most

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19:12.0

important thing is ease-of-use the most
important thing is making sure that

19:12.0

19:17.7

people have access to quality care the
most important thing is cost the most

19:17.7

19:23.0

important thing so pick your choice what
is the most important thing that works

19:23.0

19:25.9

for your company and then work from
there

19:25.9

19:34.8

so if you have a particularly a skilled
workforce and you need to be on the top

19:34.8

19:39.6

of your game for employee recruitment
and retention then you want a rich plan

19:39.6

19:44.5

that is cost effective
now when you say rich plan how would you

19:44.5

19:50.5

define that I would define that as a
plan with a reasonable deductible and

19:50.5

19:55.9

choices for how to access care so maybe
you offer a plan you offer a couple of

19:55.9

19:59.2

plans one has a low
deductible one has a higher you make

19:59.2

20:04.6

sure you’ve got good co-pays you make
sure that you’ve got a reasonable

20:04.6

20:10.0

prescription drug benefit so if that’s
what you need then I think more more

20:10.0

20:15.2

it’s more important than anything to get
into a level funded plan maybe in an

20:15.2

20:19.1

association where you have more control
of your risk so that you can offer

20:19.1

20:23.3

richer benefits and have some internal
mechanisms that help control the costs

20:23.3

20:28.2

so one of the things that I would
caution when you’re looking at plans is

20:28.2

20:33.7

there is something called a MEC plan
it’s a minimum essential coverage plan I

20:33.7

20:41.1

see it used a lot with bluer color
occupations and an employer will have to

20:41.1

20:46.2

offer a plan or need to offer something
in order to retain employees and a MEC

20:46.2

20:50.7

plan is not a full-blown health plan it
meets the minimum essential coverage

20:50.7

20:56.4

requirements of the Affordable Care Act
but it doesn’t cover hospitalization

20:56.4

21:00.7

it’s you know if you need chemo therapy
because you’ve got cancer you’re gonna

21:00.7

21:05.6

be footing that bill yourself and I have
never seen it communicated in a way that

21:05.6

21:10.6

employees don’t get hurt so I would
caution you to be careful about a MEC

21:10.6

21:15.7

plan and to be careful about a MEC plan
attached to a health sharing arrangement

21:15.7

21:20.9

there are other ways to take care of the
primary care needs besides a MEC plan

21:20.9

21:25.3

what are some of the most common plans
that you’ve put with employers that say

21:25.3

21:30.5

have ten employees and they all have
pretty much the the same common needs

21:30.5

21:36.3

what would you put a plan like that with
so I really like level funding because

21:36.3

21:43.1

each employer can tweak the plan the way
that they need to and you have you’re

21:43.1

21:49.0

only paying for the care that you need
and you know 80% of the time care is

21:49.0

21:53.0

somebody broke an arm
three people have the flu this one needs

21:53.0

21:58.2

to go get her annual exam this child
fell down and broke his other leg that’s

21:58.2

22:04.7

not expensive care and if you can take
care of that reasonably you don’t have a

22:04.7

22:09.5

long-term problem in managing your plan
and when you’re with an

22:09.5

22:15.3

GPA on level funding you are much more
in control you are not subject to

22:15.3

22:21.3

Community Rating and you can tweak the
plan annually to suit your needs and you

22:21.3

22:24.8

may not tweak your plan for three four
or five years if you’re running well and

22:24.8

22:28.3

that is not something that will happen
if you’re in the fully insured market

22:28.3

22:33.8

are there common benefits that employers
like more than employees and employees

22:33.8

22:37.1

like more than employers because
typically when when we offer health

22:37.1

22:40.7

insurance we want to attract new talent
so what is each side of the equation

22:40.7

22:47.5

looking for I think that it will come
somewhat of a surprise to most employers

22:47.5

22:54.4

to realize that when they offer a 2500
or 3500 or 5,000 dollar deductible or

22:54.4

23:00.8

$6,500 deductible that they’re basically
functionally uninsured our employees

23:00.8

23:06.3

because many hospitals now will not
treat you unless you pay obviously not

23:06.3

23:10.4

in an emergency situation but if you’re
in a non emergent situation and you need

23:10.4

23:14.9

your gallbladder out and you don’t have
$5,000 to cover the deductible most

23:14.9

23:19.4

hospitals nowadays will not let you pay
that off at 50 or $100 a month

23:19.4

23:25.6

so you’re basically functionally
uninsurable and probably need to help

23:25.6

23:31.6

you on your business so to get away from
that do whatever you have to do and that

23:31.6

23:36.9

means controlling your costs I know
that’s a pretty harsh assessment but

23:36.9

23:40.7

that is that is the reality of today so
whatever you can do to keep your

23:40.7

23:47.0

deductible low and you may have a plan
that has a 3,500 or a $5,000 deductible

23:47.0

23:52.9

as an employer you can you can help your
employee pay for that you can there are

23:52.9

23:56.8

some funding mechanisms that you can use
so that you can help an employee offset

23:56.8

24:01.6

that cost I would encourage you to look
at those things for example what are

24:01.6

24:06.3

some of those things so a health
reimbursement arrangement an HRA is

24:06.3

24:10.6

something that you know you can
contribute to and then if somebody needs

24:10.6

24:14.4

to go to the hospital you pay X amount
of the deductible you don’t need to pay

24:14.4

24:18.2

the whole thing you know if the
deductible is $5,000 maybe you pay

24:18.2

24:23.2

$2,500 that that’s one solution another
solution would be

24:23.2

24:27.6

setting up an HSA for each employee and
making a contribution so that that money

24:27.6

24:31.5

will grow over time and then when they
need to go to the hospital they have the

24:31.5

24:36.1

funds there and an employee can
contribute to an HSA themselves it’s not

24:36.1

24:42.4

something you need to manage and that
will help them over time voluntary

24:42.4

24:48.1

benefits are also helpful either on an
employee paid or an employer paid level

24:48.1

24:53.4

to help with that out of pocket so you
can skin that cat in a number of ways I

24:53.4

24:57.5

encourage you to skin the cat you know
it’s very exciting that you have put

24:57.5

25:02.6

together all of these different options
I know myself included when people go

25:02.6

25:07.4

out and they try to find plans on their
own it just seems like it’s this or that

25:07.4

25:11.2

but you have so many options that you
can put together and make a plan work

25:11.2

25:17.2

for that specific company I think that
sounds very exciting can you share some

25:17.2

25:20.7

specific instances where you’ve helped
some companies and what you’ve been able

25:20.7

25:27.3

to do sure so I move a lot of people
into level funding a lot of you know

25:27.3

25:32.8

small micro to small size businesses
into level funding it’s a little scary

25:32.8

25:37.4

at first when they see that their
premium doesn’t increase sometimes it’s

25:37.4

25:40.9

flat sometimes it’s a little less
sometimes it’s a wee bit more year over

25:40.9

25:46.3

a year usually they they’re quite happy
with that the level funding helps make

25:46.3

25:50.1

that easier for small employers you know
when you know what your fixed cost is

25:50.1

25:55.3

every month that’s that’s easier to deal
with than a low and a high and admit and

25:55.3

26:00.7

you know with a random cost monthly and
we’re having conversations now oh what’s

26:00.7

26:06.8

my premium refund this year yeah I’ve
never even heard of such a turn exactly

26:06.8

26:13.5

so and then there are employers who are
starting to use direct primary care or

26:13.5

26:18.0

concierge medicine to help take care of
all of the basic kind of medical needs

26:18.0

26:23.1

that 80% of care that needs to be
delivered and have a high deductible

26:23.1

26:29.0

health plan in place to cover the rest
you can do that too that when

26:29.0

26:33.5

communicated well and like most things
in life communication is key that is

26:33.5

26:38.1

very helpful
and that I have groups that have looked

26:38.1

26:41.8

and I’ve not sold one of these myself
but I have groups that have looked at

26:41.8

26:48.5

health sharing as an alternative with
some sort of direct primary care on the

26:48.5

26:54.7

front end and for an employer that has a
very very lean margin sometimes that is

26:54.7

27:01.1

the perfect alternative Alison you given
us a lot to think about and I gotta tell

27:01.1

27:05.8

you I thought that I could just go
online or talk to my agent and the few

27:05.8

27:09.9

plans that he gave us those were my only
options but you’ve done such a good job

27:09.9

27:15.1

of explaining all the various options
out there so we can mix and match I want

27:15.1

27:20.5

to ask if somebody was just tuning in
right now what’s the one thing you want

27:20.5

27:24.9

to leave the Scaling UP! nation with I
want to leave you with the Yogi Bear ISM

27:24.9

27:30.3

the only way that you are going to
control the cost of health care is to

27:30.3

27:34.4

control the cost of health care so
health insurance is health insurance

27:34.4

27:39.9

right insurance is simply a risk
transfer from one party to another so

27:39.9

27:46.2

there’s no cost containment strategy it
is what it is right up claim comes in it

27:46.2

27:50.4

meets the plan provisions and the
insurance company pays it and that’s all

27:50.4

27:56.1

there is to it we are never going to get
control of the cost of health care in

27:56.1

28:02.5

our country if we don’t control the cost
of care so we need to be talking with

28:02.5

28:08.4

doctors and hospitals about what care
actually costs how we can pay for it and

28:08.4

28:14.4

move into that direction so that we can
all have a sustainable healthcare system

28:14.4

28:18.8

what we have now is not sustainable so
we all need to take a more proactive

28:18.8

28:23.2

approach to our own health care
absolutely well I know you mentioned at

28:23.2

28:27.2

the top of the show that you put some
items together for the Scaling UP! nation

28:27.2

28:31.1

if they wanted to find out more about
some of the items that you mentioned on

28:31.1

28:36.8

today’s show how can they go find that
absolutely so if they go to Allison to

28:36.8

28:42.9

Polycom have forward-slash Scaling UP!
we’ve created a special landing page

28:42.9

28:47.7

just for your listeners I have an e-book
there that will help people get started

28:47.7

28:50.7

it’s it’s
a good resource for questions to ask and

28:50.7

28:54.6

sort of how the process works it’s the
process that I use with my clients

28:54.6

29:00.1

there’s also a video there that talks a
little bit about how different kinds of

29:00.1

29:04.2

tools and strategies work and why you
want to use them or don’t want to use

29:04.2

29:09.0

them and then if you want to grab
fifteen minutes on my calendar I’m happy

29:09.0

29:13.9

to talk to anybody and help give them
some questions or some alternatives and

29:13.9

29:18.5

a place to start well excellent you have
given the nation so much to think about

29:18.5

29:24.5

I want to thank you for coming on
Scaling UP! h2o and sharing all the great

29:24.5

29:28.1

information you have about health
insurance it was my pleasure thank you

29:28.1

29:34.7

for having me Scaling UP! nation I know
that health insurance is not the sexiest

29:34.7

29:40.8

of topics but it is something that we
all want and I’m gonna tell you it’s

29:40.8

29:47.0

something that we all don’t understand I
hope for the people that are listening

29:47.0

29:52.1

out there you understand that because of
the exorbitant rate increases out there

29:52.1

29:57.6

it’s not that your employer wants to
provide anything less for you out there

29:57.6

30:03.0

it’s just they simply can’t afford it
because of these rate increases one of

30:03.0

30:08.0

the benefits about having Allyson on the
show is I’m hoping that the Scaling UP!

30:08.0

30:12.8

nation can now take matters into their
own hands and instead of conforming to

30:12.8

30:18.8

just one plan we can pick and choose
from various options to make the right

30:18.8

30:23.1

plan for our company to make sure that
we have the right options for us and our

30:23.1

30:28.8

employees and then our employees out
there understand that we are trying to

30:28.8

30:35.2

do the best by them folks I’m gonna have
all of this on my show notes page alison

30:35.2

30:39.7

has a great website there is a
downloadable on her website that

30:39.7

30:43.9

explains everything that she talked
about during today’s interview I

30:43.9

30:48.5

encourage you to go to my show notes
page and link to that and download that

30:48.5

30:54.2

I know that’s going to get you closer to
the options that you are looking for

30:54.2

30:59.9

nation thanks so much for listening
thanks for the listener that rode in

30:59.9

31:04.8

actually several listeners that wrote in
and said hey we have a problem with

31:04.8

31:09.0

health insurance I know it’s not a water
treatment topic but is there any way you

31:09.0

31:16.1

can explore what we can do to offer
better benefits to our company employees

31:16.1

31:21.0

so that’s where this topic came from if
it wasn’t for you out there in the

31:21.0

31:26.0

Scaling UP! nation I would not have
sought out Allison and Allison is

31:26.0

31:31.4

fantastic and that’s because you and the
Scaling UP! nation gave me the charge to

31:31.4

31:36.5

find an expert out there to answer those
questions so please keep those questions

31:36.5

31:42.6

coming what do you want to hear on
Scaling UP! h2o what guests do you want

31:42.6

31:46.4

me to interview and what questions do
you have that you want to hear on a

31:46.4

31:52.1

future episode folks I love bringing
this show to you I hope you have a great

31:52.1

31:57.6

week and I’ll talk to you next time on
Scaling UP! h2o

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